Discrimination

  • March 28, 2024

    Employment Attys Keeping Close Eye On Abortion Pill Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court seemed inclined to preserve Americans' access to medication abortion at recent arguments in a case challenging the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's authority, which experts said would stave off an increase in worker absences and accommodation requests. Here's a look at how the justices' ruling could affect the workplace.

  • March 28, 2024

    Fired Alston & Bird Aide Fights Arbitration Of Vax Claims

    An Alston & Bird LLP staffer fired after refusing to get vaccinated for COVID-19 told a Georgia federal court that it should refuse to force her discrimination suit into arbitration, since her employment contract was not a matter of interstate commerce.

  • March 28, 2024

    Seafood Restaurant Settles EEOC Sex Harassment Suit

    A seafood restaurant reached a deal with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to shutter a suit filed in South Carolina federal court alleging it failed to step in when a female server complained she was groped and harassed by a male co-worker.

  • March 28, 2024

    Ex-Paralegal's Jobless Pay Ruling Correct, Del. Justices Told

    Delaware opposes a former Morris James LLP paralegal's bid for the state's Supreme Court to revive his attempt to collect a year's worth of unemployment benefits, arguing a lower court correctly upheld denial of pay after he settled whistleblower claims against the firm.

  • March 27, 2024

    Judge Agrees To Training For 'Overly Harsh' Workplace

    The Judicial Council for the Second Circuit has declined to review the dismissal of a law clerk's complaint against a federal judge, who acknowledged the clerk's claims of their "overly harsh" management style and agreed to participate in workplace conduct counseling and training.

  • March 27, 2024

    Mortgage Co. Too Late To Arbitrate ADA Suit, 6th Circ. Says

    The Sixth Circuit on Wednesday refused to let a mortgage broker send a deaf former software developer's disability bias suit into arbitration, saying the company shouldn't have participated in discovery for nearly seven months if it wanted to handle the case out of court.

  • March 27, 2024

    HR Services Co. May Be Liable In Harassment Suit, Court Says

    A Texas appellate court said Wednesday that more fact-finding is needed to determine whether a professional employer organization could be on the hook for a sexual harassment claim brought by a cafeteria worker, but found that the company is, legally, an employer.

  • March 27, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs Allstate In Worker's Religious Bias Appeal

    The Sixth Circuit declined Wednesday to reinstate a former Allstate employee's lawsuit alleging he was fired for expressing faith-based anti-LGBTQ views, saying he failed to rebut the company's argument that he was cut loose for his lackluster performance.

  • March 27, 2024

    Black Workers' Race Bias Suit Against Union Can't Proceed

    A group of Black workers can't bring race bias allegations against a union, a federal international trade judge concluded, dismissing a proposed class action complaint that claimed the union had a "long history of discrimination" against Black people.

  • March 27, 2024

    EEOC Scores Win In Disability Bias Suit Against RV Maker

    A recreational vehicle manufacturer violated the Americans with Disabilities Act when it sacked a painter the same day he underwent kidney stone removal surgery, an Indiana federal judge ruled Wednesday in a case brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

  • March 27, 2024

    T-Mobile Gets COVID Vax Bias Suit Narrowed

    A Michigan federal judge cut down but ultimately kept alive a former T-Mobile worker's suit Wednesday alleging the company illegally denied his request for a religious exemption to its COVID-19 vaccine requirement, ruling that a jury needs to review the claim.

  • March 27, 2024

    Foreign Workers Sue Over Alleged Illegal Recruiting Scheme

    An Atlanta-based building materials wholesaler and two recruitment and staffing agencies were hit with a proposed class action alleging they lured skilled Mexican engineers and technicians to the U.S. to fill manual labor positions under a temporary visa program for high-skilled workers.

  • March 27, 2024

    Rocket Co. Beats Religious Bias Suit Over COVID Vax Mandate

    A California federal jury sided with a rocket-maker in a Christian former employee's suit claiming it unlawfully fired him instead of granting a religious exception to its COVID-19 vaccine policy, finding an exemption would've been too burdensome on the employer.

  • March 27, 2024

    Hospital Fired Worker For Objecting To Sex Bias, EEOC Says

    A hospital fired the director of its obstetrics department after she complained to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission that she was passed over for a promotion because she's a woman, the agency said in a lawsuit filed in Kentucky federal court Wednesday.

  • March 27, 2024

    Calif. Rail Biz Attys Face DQ Bid Over Bad Faith, Info Breach

    A Black engineer accusing Pacific Harbor Line of workplace racial bias has urged a California federal judge to bar Buchannan Ingersoll & Rooney LLP from representing the railroad company, citing a sanctions bid against his counsel that had "no evidentiary basis" and "improper" communication with a paralegal for the engineer's legal team.

  • March 27, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Revive Ex-NY Law Clerk's Harassment Suit

    The Second Circuit Wednesday agreed with a New York federal district court's dismissal of a suit brought by a former New York law clerk accusing the state's judicial system of covering for a judge she says sexually harassed her, holding that it lacked jurisdiction to hear the appeal.

  • March 27, 2024

    Atlanta Firm Wins Fees In Bias Case Over 'Torrent' Of Abuse

    A Georgia federal judge awarded more than $165,000 in attorney fees and more than $33,000 in lost pay to a Black woman who was awarded nearly $3.5 million at trial in November after suffering on-the-job racial and sexual discrimination, harassment and retaliation.

  • March 27, 2024

    Eli Lilly Age Bias Suit Over Promotions Nabs Collective Status

    An age discrimination suit accusing Eli Lilly of passing over older workers for promotions in favor of millennials can move forward as a collective action, an Indiana federal judge ruled, finding thousands of workers may have been affected by the same policy.

  • March 27, 2024

    NJ AG Says Teachers On Maternity Leave Faced Possible Bias

    The New Jersey attorney general's office said Wednesday that its Division on Civil Rights preliminarily concluded that a public school district may have violated discrimination laws by preventing women on parental leave from coaching extracurricular activities.

  • March 27, 2024

    Meta Settles Fired Worker's COVID Vax Religious Bias Suit

    Facebook parent company Meta has agreed to settle a Washington federal suit brought by a former project manager who claimed he was illegally fired after refusing to be vaccinated against COVID-19 because of his religious beliefs.

  • March 27, 2024

    State & City Roundup: Wage And Hour News To Watch

    Minneapolis' upcoming pay floor for gig drivers may get a second look in the City Council, and Washington, D.C., has joined the wave of requiring pay transparency. Here, Law360 explores these and other state and local wage and hour developments attorneys should know.

  • March 26, 2024

    Jackson Paints Abortion Clash As Microcosm Of Bigger Brawl

    A war of words Tuesday at the U.S. Supreme Court over access to abortion medication marked a climactic moment after a lengthy legal slugfest. But probing questions from Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson illustrated that the main event for reproductive rights was also simply a single round in a much larger fight over the government's regulatory powers.

  • March 26, 2024

    11th Circ. Considers Reviving Urologist's Sex Bias Suit

    A urologist who alleged gender discrimination led to her removal from the University of Florida's urology department urged the Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday to overturn a district court decision freeing the university and two clinic doctors from claims levied against them in her sex bias suit.

  • March 26, 2024

    EEOC Disability Bias Suit Over Welder's Meds Sent To Trial

    A U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission disability bias suit needs a jury's review, a Texas federal judge found, saying too many fact issues prevented the court from determining whether an oilfield manufacturer unlawfully yanked a job offer from a welder over his opioid use disorder medication.

  • March 26, 2024

    11th Circ. Affirms RaceTrac Win In Worker's FMLA Bias Fight

    A split Eleventh Circuit panel has upheld RaceTrac Petroleum's early win in a Family and Medical Leave Act lawsuit filed by a former engineer, finding she never medically certified her abrupt leave from the company, which itself had legitimate business reasons for eliminating her position shortly after she returned to work.

Expert Analysis

  • NY, Minn. Set Pace For Employee Breastfeeding Protections

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    Breastfeeding employees have gotten increased legal protections through recently effective amendments in New York and Minnesota, and the laws underline the need for employers to watch for state-level legislative efforts to extend these protections beyond federal requirements, say John Litchfield and Miranda Curtis at Foley & Lardner.

  • Bar Score Is Best Hiring Metric Post-Affirmative Action

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    After the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling striking down affirmative action admissions policies, law firms looking to foster diversity in hiring should view an applicant's Multistate Bar Examination score as the best metric of legal ability — over law school name or GPA, says attorney Alice Griffin.

  • What To Expect From High Court's Whistleblower Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's upcoming decision in Murray v. UBS Securities will likely have widespread implications for the future of anti-retaliation whistleblower litigation, and could make it more difficult for would-be whistleblower-employees to succeed on anti-retaliation claims under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, say Ann-Elizabeth Ostrager and Diane McGimsey at Sullivan & Cromwell.

  • 'Equal Harassment' Is No Shield Against Title VII Claims

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    The Ninth Circuit’s decision in Sharp v. S&S Activewear, rejecting an employer's claim that it did not create a sexually hostile work environment because the misogynist music it played offended all workers equally, reminds companies that they can face Title VII liability even when misconduct does not target a specific group, says Laura Lawless at Squire Patton.

  • Recent Changes Mark A Key Moment For New York High Court

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    Recent developments in the New York Court of Appeals — from rapid turnover and increasing diversity, to a perception among some of growing politicization — mark an important turning point, and the court will continue to evolve in the coming year as it considers a number of important cases, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • How End Of Forced Arb. Is Affecting Sex Harassment Cases

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    A little over a year after the Ending Forced Arbitration of Sexual Assault Act became effective, we have started seeing substantive interpretation of the EFAA, almost exclusively from the U.S. district courts in New York, and there are two key takeaways for employers, says Lisa Haldar at Lawrence & Bundy.

  • Adjusting Anti-Harassment Policies For Remote Work

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    Limited employee oversight and a lack of privacy in virtual meetings are just two examples of drawbacks to remote work that increase the risk of workplace harassment — but employers can adapt their existing anti-harassment policies to better suit these circumstances, says Ellen Holloman at Cadwalader.

  • Worker Accommodations After Justices' Religious Bias Ruling

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    While the U.S. Supreme Court's recent Groff v. DeJoy decision makes it easier for employees to obtain religious accommodations under Title VII, it also guarantees more litigation over what counts as a substantial hardship for businesses, as lower courts will have to interpret the exact contours of the new standard, says Caroline Corbin at the University of Miami School of Law.

  • The Differing Court Approaches To Pay Equity Questions

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    Employers face the tough task of navigating an increasingly complex patchwork of pay equity laws and court interpretations, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • Legal Profession Must Do More For Lawyers With Disabilities

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    At the start of Disability Pride month, Rosalyn Richter at Arnold & Porter looks at why lawyers with disabilities are significantly underrepresented in private practice, asserting that law firms and other employers must do more to conquer the implicit bias that deters attorneys from seeking accommodations.

  • Calif. Whistleblower Decision Signals Change For Employers

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    Because the California Supreme Court's recent The People v. Kolla's decision significantly expands employee whistleblower protections, employers should ensure that internal reporting procedures clearly communicate the appropriate methods of reporting and elevating suspected violations of law, say Alison Tsao and Sophia Jimenez at CDF Labor Law.

  • What Affirmative Action Ruling Means For Higher Ed And Cos.

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's holding that race-conscious admissions programs at two educational institutions violate the Constitution's equal protection clause applied the "strict scrutiny" standard that governs race-conscious programs in a way that will be very difficult for educational institutions and other entities to satisfy, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Pay Transparency And ESG Synergy Can Inform Initiatives

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    The proliferation of pay transparency laws and ESG initiatives has created unique opportunities for companies to comply with the challenging laws while furthering their social aims, says Kelly Cardin at Ogletree.