Labor

  • April 17, 2024

    NLRB Judge Told Of College Hoopsters' Hotel Curfew Guard

    A Stanford University runner testified on Wednesday for the National Labor Relations Board that some student-athletes should be considered employees due to the control programs exert over them, and that a time he encountered a hotel curfew guard for a Division I basketball team highlights how tight that control can be.

  • April 17, 2024

    Biden Admin Probes Chinese Shipbuilders For Unfair Trade

    The Biden administration launched an investigation Wednesday into whether China used unfair practices to gain a competitive edge in the global shipping and maritime services sector, setting the stage for potential new tariffs against Beijing.

  • April 17, 2024

    Starbucks Threatened Unionizing Hawaii Baristas, NLRB Says

    Starbucks violated federal labor law when it told workers at a Hawaii cafe that they could miss out on a raise and lose the ability to pick up shifts at other stores if they unionized, the National Labor Relations Board held Wednesday, upholding an agency judge's ruling.

  • April 17, 2024

    Amazon Urges NLRB To Reopen Challenge To Union Win

    Amazon asked the National Labor Relations Board to reopen the record in its challenge to a union's representation election win at a Staten Island warehouse, arguing it was prevented from introducing evidence from a recent documentary bolstering its claim that union misconduct tainted the election.

  • April 17, 2024

    2nd Circ. Reopens NLRB Enforcement Row Against Radio Co.

    The Second Circuit will review the National Labor Relations Board's allegations that a radio station operator violated a court's consent judgment enforcing a board decision, with the appeals court appointing a special master to oversee the contempt proceeding.

  • April 17, 2024

    Fox Rothschild Hires Employment Atty In Atlantic City

    Fox Rothschild LLP has added a labor and employment partner with decades of experience in collective bargaining, resolving workplace disputes and risk management to its Atlantic City, New Jersey, office.

  • April 17, 2024

    Meat Biz Says NLRB Is 'Bullying' It In Subpoena Row

    A meatpacking business accused of improperly transferring union work told a New York federal court it shouldn't face fines for withholding some documents from National Labor Relations Board prosecutors, saying the prosecutors don't need them and are "bullying" a small business that "barely survived the pandemic."

  • April 17, 2024

    Ex-Union Leader Wielded 'Financial Ruin' At Jobsite, Jury Told

    Prosecutors told a federal jury Wednesday that ex-Philadelphia labor leader John Dougherty threatened a jobsite manager with "financial ruin" if the man refused to pay his nephew, Gregory Fiocca, despite spotty attendance during the construction of the Live! Casino.

  • April 17, 2024

    School District To Pay $200K To End EEOC Age Bias Suit

    An Illinois school district will pay about $206,000 to bring an end to a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit claiming it capped salary increases for teachers over 45 to dodge increased retirement payments, the agency said Wednesday.

  • April 17, 2024

    NLRB Says Co. Violated Labor Law With Wage Suit Questions

    A chemical manufacturer illegally questioned an employee about his conversations with co-workers and union stewards linked to a wage and hour lawsuit, the National Labor Relations Board concluded, upholding an agency judge's decision about the workers' confidentiality interests.

  • April 17, 2024

    Welch's Rehire Challenge Should Fail, Judge Recommends

    Welch Foods should comply with an arbitrator's order to rehire a Teamsters-represented worker fired for making vulgar comments to a female co-worker, a Pennsylvania federal magistrate judge said, recommending that the district judge toss the company's challenge to the order.

  • April 16, 2024

    NLRB Revives Worker's Union Ouster Bid At Bus Co. Plant

    The National Labor Relations Board reinstated a worker's bid to oust the Communications Workers of America at a bus manufacturing facility in Kentucky on Tuesday, finding the employee made a good faith effort to send signatures for a decertification petition via fax.

  • April 16, 2024

    NLRB Official OKs Teamsters Vote At Food Distributor

    A group of delivery drivers at a United Natural Foods Inc. facility in Florida may vote in a representation election with a Teamsters local, a National Labor Relations Board official determined, saying the company couldn't show that an end to the workers' employment was imminent.

  • April 16, 2024

    Starbucks, Union In Talks To Settle Bargaining Fight

    Starbucks and Workers United are in talks to settle a National Labor Relations Board suit accusing the company of refusing to bargain labor contracts, according to a notice released Tuesday.

  • April 16, 2024

    Meet The Atty For An Ex-Union Leader Facing His 3rd Trial

    The only thing standing between ex-Philly union leader John Dougherty and a third conviction is attorney Greg Pagano, and he feels confident going into the next trial that things will be different. 

  • April 16, 2024

    Mortgage Co. Fights NLRB GC's Bid For Broad Remedies

    A mortgage lender told the National Labor Relations Board to reject a request from agency attorneys seeking an expansive make-whole remedy for workers who were affected by illegal work rules, arguing that such relief would flout federal labor law.

  • April 15, 2024

    Coal Exec's Widow Seeks Atty Fees After Toss Of $6.5B Suit

    The widow of a bankrupt coal company's former president requested $525,000 in attorney fees and costs Monday after a D.C. federal judge tossed a suit alleging her husband's estate and another business owed a union pension plan $6.5 billion, saying the plan's trustees can afford to pay.

  • April 15, 2024

    Union, Workers Fight Subpoena Order Over NY Starbucks

    Workers United and former Starbucks employees objected to a federal judge's order to comply with a subpoena of communications about workers' sentiments toward the union at a Long Island, New York, store, arguing the company's information bids run counter to workers' confidentiality and privacy rights.

  • April 15, 2024

    Guard Claims Union Kept Her 'In The Dark' About Fees

    An International Guards Union of America affiliate did not give a U.S. Department of Homeland Security employee an audit report on agency fees and kept her "in the dark about its finances," she told a D.C. federal court, arguing the union violated its duty of fair representation.

  • April 15, 2024

    1st Circ. Reopens Fired Whole Foods Worker's BLM Mask Suit

    The First Circuit reinstated a lawsuit accusing Whole Foods of unlawfully disciplining and then firing an employee who wore a Black Lives Matter mask at work, overturning the Amazon-owned supermarket chain's pretrial win.

  • April 15, 2024

    Justices Won't Review Ex-NYC Union Head's Bribery Rap

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to take up the appeal of a former New York City union president who was convicted of taking bribes from now-defunct hedge fund Platinum Partners, rejecting a petition that argued his attorney failed to tell him about the trial judge's conflicts of interest.

  • April 12, 2024

    Hospital Asks DC Circ. To Rethink 'Successor Bar' Ruling

    A Puerto Rico hospital on Friday asked the D.C. Circuit to reconsider a February panel decision that upheld the National Labor Relations Board's finding that the hospital unlawfully withdrew recognition from a union, saying it was too deferential to the board's interpretation of federal labor law.

  • April 12, 2024

    Starbucks Warns Of Open 'Floodgates' With NLRB Deference

    Starbucks told the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday that siding with the National Labor Relations Board's arguments about deference to the agency for federal court injunction requests would "open the floodgates" in other ways for deference to federal agencies.

  • April 12, 2024

    DC Circ.'s NLRB Rebuke Aids Employers' Monitoring Defense

    A recent D.C. Circuit decision knocking the National Labor Relations Board for finding a trucking company illegally barred a driver from covering his in-cabin camera could be good news for employers amid an initiative by the board's chief prosecutor to curb workplace monitoring.

  • April 12, 2024

    Mich. High Court Snapshot: Atty Sanctions Kick Off April

    The Michigan Supreme Court returns Tuesday for its April session, hearing oral arguments about judges' ability to sanction lawyers for past attorneys' work in a case, what defendants say could be double recovery in wrongful death cases, and an attempt to use a Larry Nassar-inspired law to sue Catholic priests for decades-old abuse allegations.

Expert Analysis

  • Assessing Work Rules After NLRB Handbook Ruling

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    The National Labor Relations Board's Stericycle decision last year sparked uncertainty surrounding whether historically acceptable work rules remain lawful — but employers can use a two-step analysis to assess whether to implement a given rule and how to do so in a compliant manner, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • A Look At Global Employee Disconnect Laws For US Counsel

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    As countries worldwide adopt employee right to disconnect laws, U.S. in-house counsel at corporations with a global workforce must develop a comprehensive understanding of the laws' legal and cultural implications, ensuring their companies can safeguard employee welfare while maintaining legal compliance, say Emma Corcoran and Ute Krudewagen at DLA Piper.

  • Employers Beware Of NLRB Changes On Bad Faith Bargaining

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    Recent National Labor Relations Board decisions show a trend of the agency imposing harsher remedies on employers for bad faith bargaining over union contracts, a position upheld in the Ninth Circuit's recent NLRB v. Grill Concepts Services decision, says Daniel Johns at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • What A Post-Chevron Landscape Could Mean For Labor Law

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    With the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling on Chevron deference expected by the end of June, it’s not too soon to consider how National Labor Relations Act interpretations could be affected if federal courts no longer defer to administrative agencies’ statutory interpretation and regulatory actions, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Eye On Compliance: Employee Social Media Privacy In NY

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    A New York law that recently took effect restricts employers' ability to access the personal social media accounts of employees and job applicants, signifying an increasing awareness of the need to balance employers' interests with worker privacy and free speech rights, says Madjeen Garcon-Bonneau at Wilson Elser.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • What The NIL Negotiation Rules Injunction Means For NCAA

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    A Tennessee federal court's recent preliminary injunction reverses several prominent and well-established NCAA rules on negotiations with student-athletes over name, image and likeness compensation and shows that collegiate athletics is a profoundly unsettled legal environment, say attorneys at Pillsbury.

  • Takeaways From NLRB Advice On 'Outside' Employment

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    Rebecca Leaf at Miles & Stockbridge examines a recent memo from the National Labor Relations Board’s Division of Advice that said it’s unlawful for employers to restrict secondary or outside employment, and explains what companies should know about the use of certain restrictive covenants going forward.

  • Shaping Speech Policies After NLRB's BLM Protest Ruling

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    After the National Labor Relations Board decided last month that a Home Depot employee was protected by federal labor law when they wore a Black Lives Matter slogan on their apron, employers should consider four questions in order to mitigate legal risks associated with workplace political speech policies, say Louis Cannon and Cassandra Horton at Baker Donelson.

  • 2026 World Cup: Companies Face Labor Challenges And More

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    Companies sponsoring or otherwise involved with the 2026 FIFA World Cup — hosted jointly by the U.S., Canada and Mexico — should be proactive in preparing to navigate many legal considerations in immigration, labor management and multijurisdictional workforces surrounding the event, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Eye On Compliance: Workplace March Madness Pools

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    With March Madness set to begin in a few weeks, employers should recognize that workplace sports betting is technically illegal, keeping federal and state gambling laws in mind when determining whether they will permit ever-popular bracket pools, says Laura Stutz at Wilson Elser.

  • There Is No NCAA Supremacy Clause, Especially For NIL

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    A recent Tennessee federal court ruling illustrates the NCAA's problematic position that its member schools should violate state law rather than its rules — and the organization's legal history with the dormant commerce clause raises a fundamental constitutional issue that will have to be resolved before attorneys can navigate NIL with confidence, says Patrick O’Donnell at HWG.