Intellectual Property

  • March 22, 2024

    Lutron Cleared On Shade Trade Dress Claims

    A New York federal judge has thrown out trade dress claims that GeigTech brought against home lighting fixtures company Lutron, writing that "there is no evidence that Lutron wanted members of the consuming public to think that it was selling J. Geiger shades."

  • March 22, 2024

    Accused Purveyor Of Tesla Trade Secrets Poised To Get Bail

    A New York federal judge on Friday agreed to let a China-based businessman out on bail under strict conditions while he faces accusations of plotting to sell trade secrets concerning battery technology that were stolen from Tesla.

  • March 22, 2024

    $900M Trade Secrets Case Against Kaiser Foundation Flops

    A California state judge has ruled that, after more than five years of litigation against the Kaiser Foundation, a pastor's small medical technology startup cannot "explain what was unique or secret about its conception for transmitting patient data" that was purportedly worth beyond $900 million.

  • March 22, 2024

    Vanda's Obviousness Appeal Isn't Worthwhile, Teva Tells Justices

    Teva Pharmaceuticals and Apotex have said the U.S. Supreme Court should reject a petition from Vanda Pharmaceuticals, which said the Federal Circuit "charted its own course" when it invalidated its sleep drug patents as obvious.

  • March 22, 2024

    DraftKings' Suit Is 'Character Assassination,' Former VP Says

    A former DraftKings executive picked apart a trade secret suit brought against him in Massachusetts federal court by his ex-employer, saying it's an attempt to "torch his reputation" with questionable evidence that also demonstrates the company's practice of smearing employees who leave for better opportunities.

  • March 22, 2024

    Parts Of Secret Recording Buried In Blackbeard Ship Suit

    A North Carolina state judge has ruled that parts of a secret recording of a 2014 meeting between the state Department of Natural and Cultural Resources and the organization that discovered the pirate Blackbeard's sunken ship fall under attorney-client privilege and must be redacted as part of a contract dispute over footage and images of the ship.

  • March 22, 2024

    Apple TM Stands After TTAB Denies Musician's Bid To Cancel

    The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board has denied a jazz musician's bid to cancel Apple Inc.'s trademark, rejecting his arguments that Apple abandoned the mark by not using it for entertainment services for at least three years.

  • March 22, 2024

    What Patent Attys Should Know About 5th Circ. Transfer Case

    Federal Circuit practitioners should have their eye on a precedential Fifth Circuit decision from earlier this month that provided new guidance on weighing factors used to analyze whether to transfer a case, in particular factors related to court congestion and convenience for witnesses.

  • March 22, 2024

    Albright Denies Salesforce Bid For Patent Sanctions

    Salesforce.com Inc. waited too long to pursue sanctions against a prolific patent litigator who already voluntarily dismissed claims brought in a federal suit in Texas, U.S. District Judge Alan D. Albright has ruled, agreeing with a magistrate judge's report and recommendation to toss the sanctions bid.

  • March 22, 2024

    Top Dutch Court Blocks Russia's Last Bid For Vodka TMs

    Former Yukos Oil Co. shareholders said Friday that the Netherlands' top court has thrown out Russia's final bid to stop their seizure of over a dozen renowned Russian vodka trademarks in an effort to enforce $50 billion in arbitral awards.

  • March 22, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen the BBC and Wall to Wall Media hit with a passing off lawsuit by musician BOSSIIE, Poundland parent company Pepco Group file a commercial fraud claim against several mobile network giants, family law specialists Alexiou Fisher Philipps LLP start proceedings against former oil trader Michael Prest, and a transgender lawyer file a libel claim against a blogger. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • March 22, 2024

    Polsinelli Adds In-House Biotech IP Atty In Boston

    An experienced in-house biotechnology attorney has joined Polsinelli PC's intellectual property department as counsel in Boston.

  • March 21, 2024

    Tennessee Adopts Landmark Law To Protect Artists Against AI

    Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee signed into law Thursday a first-of-its-kind legislation intended to tackle misuse of artificial intelligence by modifying a state law banning unauthorized copies of artists' works to cover musicians, their voices and their songs.

  • March 21, 2024

    Nexstar Ducks Antitrust Suit Over Retransmission Fees

    DirecTV says it refused to ink retransmission deals with two companies that were illegally collaborating with Nexstar Media Group Inc. to fix prices, resulting in massive channel blackouts and customer loss, but according to a New York federal judge, that refusal is why its antitrust claims fall flat.

  • March 21, 2024

    Schumer Urges Texas District To Adopt Judge-Shopping Rule

    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer on Thursday urged the chief judge of the Northern District of Texas to quickly implement the Judicial Conference of the United States' updated policy that looks to prevent litigants from judge shopping, arguing that the district's current practices are "dangerous."

  • March 21, 2024

    Atty Takes Fight Over VLSI's 'Extortion' Claims To Fed. Court

    A Minnesota lawyer and a company he is affiliated with are taking their dispute with patent outfit VLSI Technology to Virginia federal court in an effort to fend off accusations that he is behind an "extortion" effort disguised as a petition to the Patent Trial and Appeal Board.

  • March 21, 2024

    Report Ranks Lawmakers On IP But Finds Few Are Engaged

    The Council for Innovation Promotion issued a report Thursday ranking members of Congress on their support for strong intellectual property rights, praising a few "IP champions," criticizing some detractors, but concluding that "the vast majority of legislators fail entirely to engage meaningfully on IP."

  • March 21, 2024

    Ford Says $350K TM Jury Award Can't Be Boosted To $15M

    Ford Motor Co. on Wednesday urged a Michigan federal court to deny a tech company's request to boost an unfair competition award against Ford from less than half a million to $15 million because the tech company didn't challenge Ford's sales and profit data at trial. 

  • March 21, 2024

    NY Disbars 'Copyright Troll' Atty For Ignoring Orders, Lying

    A suspended New York attorney who became known as a "copyright troll" has been disbarred, with a state appeals court concluding that a long pattern of noncompliance with court orders and making false representations during cases merits the punishment.

  • March 21, 2024

    Business Coalition Rebuffs Biden Plan To Seize Drug Patents

    The Biden administration's proposal to exercise so-called march-in rights to seize drug patents would harm innovation in the U.S., according to an assemblage of business-focused groups.

  • March 21, 2024

    Teleflex Catheter Patent Makes It Through Fed. Circ.

    The Federal Circuit on Thursday opted to leave untouched an administrative patent board ruling that rejected a legal effort to invalidate a patent covering a type of catheter that's sold by Teleflex. 

  • March 21, 2024

    TTAB Rejects 'ZPile' TM As 'Descriptive' Of Metal Sheet Piles

    A construction materials company's attempt to register "ZPile" as a trademark has failed at the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, which affirmed an examining attorney's denial of the mark because it's "merely descriptive" of a term known in the industry as a type of metal sheet pile.

  • March 21, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Upholds Edwards' PTAB Win On Heart Valve Patent

    The Federal Circuit has affirmed a Patent Trial and Appeal Board finding that various parts of medical technology maker Cardiovalve's patent on an artificial heart valve implant were invalid as obvious.

  • March 21, 2024

    Pool Company Aims To Bar Rival's False Ads After Verdict

    A swimming pool equipment manufacturer is looking to permanently ban a competitor from using deceptive marketing techniques on Amazon after a federal jury in North Carolina slapped the rival company with a nearly $15 million verdict for false advertising and unfair business practices.

  • March 21, 2024

    Barings' Exec Helped Raid Employees To Join Rival, Suit Says

    A former executive of the investment firm Barings LLC is accused of joining a rival firm who together conspired to hire away 21 Barings employees and then offered to buy the decimated Barings unit for "on the dollar" in "one of the largest corporate raids at an asset manager in years," a suit alleges.

Expert Analysis

  • 10 Global Antitrust Trends To Anticipate In 2024

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    Proactive navigation of the antitrust enforcement environment remains crucial this year as legal policy and tools evolve to meet intensifying global economic complexity, including geopolitical tensions, trade realignment, market volatility and inflation, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • 5 Trade Secret Developments To Follow In 2024

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    Recent cases and trends in trade secret law indicate that significant developments are likely this year, and practitioners should be anticipating their impact on the business and legal landscape, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Supreme Court Amgen Ruling's Major Effect On Enablement

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's Amgen v. Sanofi invalidity holding continues to significantly affect technologies and all aspects of the patent system by providing confidence in the Federal Circuit's approach and a clearer understanding on enforceability and the disclosure needed for compliance, say Irena Royzman and Daniel Williams at Kramer Levin.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • Fed. Circ. Cellect Ruling Triggers Significant Patent Risk

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    A recent data analysis shows that the Federal Circuit's decision of patent invalidity in Cellect presents a significant risk to patent holders with subsequent child applications, which may be unpatentable under the judicially created doctrine of obvious-type double patenting, says Curtis Altmann at Hoffmann & Baron.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

  • 6 Focus Areas For Companies Managing The Risks Of AI Use

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    To harness the significant and potentially transformative benefits that generative artificial intelligence can confer, companies must establish appropriate oversight and governance, ensure appropriate disclosures, and resolve other regulatory and legal challenges arising from deployment, say attorneys at Shearman.

  • On The Edge: Lessons In Patent Litigation Financing

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    A federal judge's recent request that the U.S. Department of Justice look into IP Edge patent litigation, and that counsel be disciplined, serves as a reminder for parties asserting intellectual property rights — and their attorneys — to exercise caution when structuring a litigation financing agreement, say Samuel Habein and James De Vellis at Foley & Lardner.

  • Trends That Tech Lawyers Should Keep An Eye On In 2024

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    Worldwide technology spending is projected to strengthen in 2024, spurred by artificial intelligence-driven solutions, and five areas of growth may affect lawyers' practice in this sector, says Sonia Baldia at Kilpatrick.

  • Copyright And Generative AI Developments To Watch In 2024

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    This year could bring clarity to critical copyright issues raised by the recent surge of development in generative AI platforms, as Congress continues its legislative focus in this area and litigation tests theories of liability, say Joshua Weigensberg and Felicity Kohn at Pryor Cashman.

  • Emerging Risks Affecting The Tech Legal Landscape

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    The tech industry has become a battleground for various legal challenges shaped by geopolitical events, partisan politics, regulatory initiatives, patent disputes and class action trends, but companies can adopt several proactive legal strategies to safeguard their interests, say Natasha Allen and Louis Lehot at Foley & Lardner.

  • 5 Litigation Funding Trends To Note In 2024

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    Over the next year and beyond, litigation funding will continue to evolve in ways that affect attorneys and the larger litigation landscape, from the growth of a secondary market for funded claims, to rising interest rates restricting the availability of capital, says Jeffery Lula at GLS Capital.

  • Expect National Security Scrutiny Of Higher Ed To Continue

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    In 2023, the federal government significantly elevated the national security responsibilities of academic communities, so universities and research laboratories should take a more rigorous approach to research partnerships, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Medtronic's Cautionary Tale Of Fed. Circ. Word Limits

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    The Federal Circuit's ruling in Medtronic v. Teleflex that Medtronic waived an argument that it had sought to incorporate by reference illustrates the pitfalls facing parties in complex patent cases involving numerous issues that cannot all be addressed within the strict word limits for appellate briefs, say Sean Murray and Jeremiah Helm at Knobbe Martens.

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