Intellectual Property

  • April 01, 2024

    Apple, Intel Again Lose Fintiv APA Challenge In Calif. Court

    A California federal judge on Sunday ended Big Tech's coordinated challenge to Patent Trial and Appeal Board precedent that allows its judges to discretionarily deny patent reviews based on how proposed reviews overlap with related litigation in other forums.

  • April 01, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Revives Challenges To J&J Schizophrenia Drug

    A Federal Circuit panel on Monday gave generics-makers Teva Pharmaceuticals USA Inc. and Viatris Inc. a new chance to prove that a patent on Johnson & Johnson's blockbuster schizophrenia drug Invega Sustenna is invalid, saying a lower court used an "erroneously rigid" analysis when rejecting their challenge.

  • April 01, 2024

    Pool Co. Seeks $4.36M In Atty Fees After False Ad Verdict

    Attorneys from McCarter & English LLP and Womble Bond Dickinson LLP are seeking more than $4 million in fees following a multimillion-dollar verdict in a North Carolina false advertising and unfair business practices suit involving rival pool supply companies.

  • April 01, 2024

    Sports Illustrated Hits 'Gangster' Ex-Publisher With IP Suit

    The owner of Sports Illustrated alleges in a $49 million lawsuit filed Monday in Manhattan federal court that an energy drink mogul acted like a "gangster" when he became the magazine's publisher, tearing apart a long-standing licensing agreement while sabotaging the brand and holding hostage valuable intellectual property.

  • April 01, 2024

    Gwyneth Paltrow's Goop Faces TM Suit Over Health Products

    Oregon-based Good Clean Love Inc. sued Gwyneth Paltrow's Goop Inc. for trademark infringement over its good.clean.goop women's health products, alleging that the rival's branding is threatening Good Clean Love's reputation and goodwill by sowing customer confusion.

  • April 01, 2024

    High Court Refuses To Revisit Alice Ruling In Steel Beam Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined Monday to revisit its landmark ruling on how courts should determine patent eligibility, this time rejecting a plea coming from a company whose claim to have invented an important new method for automating the manufacture of steel beams failed to hold up in court.

  • April 01, 2024

    Ex-Pharma Co. Exec Denies Signing Noncompete Deal

    The former director of government sales for a pharmaceutical company asked the North Carolina Business Court on Friday to knock out a breach of contract claim in a lawsuit that alleges he took trade secrets to a competitor, arguing the company has no valid noncompete agreement to back it up.

  • April 01, 2024

    In East Texas, Korean Biz Bags $10M Verdict Over 5G Patents

    Jurors in Texas federal court ordered a Chinese phone manufacturer on Monday to pay more than $10 million to Korean entity Pantech in a patent dispute over technology used to comply with 5G wireless standards.

  • April 01, 2024

    Duracell Gets Vape Co.'s 'Optimum' TM Suit Tossed For Good

    A New Jersey federal judge has thrown out a vape company's trademark suit alleging Duracell U.S. Operations Inc. infringed on its trademark for the "Optimum" brand name, saying there's no evidence showing any actual or potential confusion between the companies' products.

  • March 29, 2024

    Northern Texas Judges Won't Adopt Judge-Shopping Rule

    Judges with the Northern District of Texas have opted not to make any changes to how cases are assigned, despite a recent letter from Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer urging the district to implement an updated policy aiming to prevent litigants from judge shopping, the district's chief judge said Friday.

  • March 29, 2024

    Intel License Defense Tossed In Calif. VLSI Patent Case

    A California federal judge on Friday threw out Intel's counterclaim arguing that it has a license to VLSI's microchip patents in a multibillion-dollar dispute, indicating that it can be raised in a separate case.

  • March 29, 2024

    Judge Denies Injunction For Tyvaso Drug Competitor

    A D.C. federal judge Friday denied drugmaker United Therapeutics Corp.'s attempt to preemptively block the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from approving a new competitor to its blockbuster pulmonary hypertension medication Tyvaso, saying the company was effectively seeking to challenge an agency action before the FDA made one.

  • March 29, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Tears Cancer Testing Rivals Apart In Injunction Args

    A trio of Federal Circuit judges appeared fed up Friday with a Morrison Foerster LLP attorney who they repeatedly suggested was focusing on arguments not raised to the district court judge who had blocked her client from selling certain cancer tests while facing infringement litigation.

  • March 29, 2024

    Allergan Scoffs At Sandoz Bid To Undo $39M Patent Loss

    Allergan told the Federal Circuit to reject Sandoz's fight over a $39 million verdict against it for infringing an Allergan eyelash growth drug patent, saying Sandoz's reliance on a 2014 decision involving the same drug misses the decision's central point.

  • March 29, 2024

    In Pandora Win, Fed. Circ. Won't Revive Playlist Patents

    The Federal Circuit on Friday declined to revive a collection of patents on generating playlists that were issued to an early, erstwhile executive at Amazon and were asserted in a failed lawsuit against music streaming website Pandora.

  • March 29, 2024

    9th Circ. Critical Of Treasure Hunter's Insurance Appeal

    A Ninth Circuit panel expressed doubt Friday that a treasure hunter could get an insurer to pay him a $7.5 million settlement over a soured shipwreck salvaging expedition, suggesting his ex-partners' refusal to hand over vital maps was an intentional act to keep him from striking gold — not an accident covered by insurance.

  • March 29, 2024

    UK Photog Tells Judge Napster License Didn't Cover Original Art

    A British photographer told a Washington federal judge Friday that Napster's promotion of a reggae record infringed his copyright for the photo used on the album cover, arguing that even though he licensed the album art to a record company, the music streamer did not have rights to the photo itself.

  • March 29, 2024

    Winston & Strawn Looks To Settle Brief-Copying IP Suit

    A Winston & Strawn LLP attorney on Friday told a Manhattan federal judge that the firm is angling to settle a copyright infringement suit that accuses its attorneys of copying a motion-to-dismiss filing by a boutique intellectual property firm "nearly verbatim," saying it isn't worth the cost to all involved.

  • March 29, 2024

    Nikola Says Convicted Ex-CEO Plotting Illegal Board Takeover

    Electric truck manufacturer Nikola Corp. sued its former CEO and convicted felon Trevor Milton in Arizona federal court Friday, accusing him of scheming with unqualified loyalists to regain control of the company by flouting securities laws, infringing Nikola's trademarks and breaching agreements.

  • March 29, 2024

    Vidal Tells PTAB To Better Explain Nokia Challenge Denials

    U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Director Kathi Vidal has vacated the Patent Trial and Appeal Board's refusal to hear three patent challenges by Nokia, telling the board to more fully explain its holding that the patent office had already considered the invalidity arguments.

  • March 29, 2024

    Trojan Battery Co. Gets $2.6M Win In TM Row

    A Texas federal judge has sided with Trojan Battery Co. in its trademark infringement and unfair competition case against Trojan EV LLC and Golf Carts of Cypress LLC, ordering a permanent injunction and an award of millions of dollars.

  • March 29, 2024

    Vidal Offers 'Peace Of Mind' For MDL Rivals Heading To PTAB

    U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Director Kathi Vidal has set new boundaries on interpreting the Patent Trial and Appeal Board's discretionary denial precedent for follow-on petitions, making clear that defendants can work together in multidistrict litigation without giving up the right to file separate patent challenges.

  • March 29, 2024

    Gambling Co. To Face Most Card Shuffle Tech Antitrust Claims

    An Illinois federal judge largely refused to let Scientific Games Corp. duck monopolization claims over its automatic card shufflers dominance, finding that with the exception of two out of six asserted patents, a would-be rival has adequately alleged the company tricked the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office into granting those patents.

  • March 29, 2024

    Del. Judge Clears Liquidia To Sell Lung-Disease Drug

    A Delaware federal judge has ruled that biochemical startup Liquidia can launch its lung disease drug after the Federal Circuit upheld a patent board ruling cutting out the remaining claims in a hypertension patent owned by United Therapeutics that was keeping the drug off the market.

  • March 29, 2024

    DraftKings Rips Former Exec's 'Lies' In Ongoing Fanatics Spat

    Former DraftKings executive Michael Hermalyn lied in his opposition last week to its preliminary injunction request, just as he had during his departure to rival Fanatics and throughout a trade secrets and breach of contract suit against him, the company has told a Massachusetts federal court in defending its injunction request.

Expert Analysis

  • Is Compulsory Copyright Licensing Needed For AI Tech?

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    The U.S. Copyright Office's inquiry into whether Congress should establish a compulsory licensing regime for artificial intelligence technologies that are trained on copyrighted works has received relatively little attention — but commenters recently opposed the regime under three key themes, say Michael Kientzle and Ryan White at Arnold & Porter.

  • EDNY Ruling Charts 99 Problems In Rap Lyric Admissibility

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    A New York federal court’s recent ruling in U.S. v. Jordan powerfully captures courts’ increasing skepticism about the admissibility of rap lyrics as evidence in criminal trials, particularly at a time when artists face economic incentives to embrace fictional, hyperbolic narratives, say attorneys at Sher Tremonte.

  • 3 Principles For Minimizing The Risk Of A Nuclear Verdict

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    In one of the latest examples of so-called nuclear verdicts, a single plaintiff was awarded $2.25 billion in a jury trial against Monsanto — revealing the need for defense attorneys to prioritize trust, connection and simplicity when communicating with modern juries, say Jenny Hergenrother and Mia Falzarano at Alston & Bird.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Opinion

    Patent Waiver For COVID Meds Would Harm US Biopharma

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    If the Biden administration backs the World Trade Organization in waiving patent rights on COVID-19 treatments, it would negatively affect the U.S. biopharmaceutical industry and help foreign competitors, without necessarily expanding global access to COVID-19 care, says clinical pathologist Wolfgang Klietmann.

  • NCAA's Antitrust Litigation History Offers Clues For NIL Case

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    Attorneys at Perkins Coie analyze the NCAA's long history of antitrust litigation to predict how state attorney general claims against NCAA recruiting rules surrounding name, image and likeness discussions will stand up in Tennessee federal court.

  • Key Considerations For Evaluating An AI Vendor

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    As artificial intelligence technology advances across industries, businesses can mitigate risks, while maximizing the value of their investment, by evaluating technology, expertise, support services, transparency and more when selecting an AI vendor, say Rahul Kapoor and Shokoh Yaghoubi at Morgan Lewis.

  • Exploring The Foreign Discovery Trend In Delaware

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    Despite a U.S. Supreme Court decision limiting the use of Section 1782, recent trends from a Delaware federal court suggest that Delaware remains an appealing forum for such foreign discovery requests, says Florentina Field at Abrams & Bayliss.

  • SAG-AFTRA Contract Is A Landmark For AI And IP Interplay

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    SAG-AFTRA's recently ratified contract with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers introduced a framework to safeguard performers' intellectual property rights and set the stage for future discussions on how those rights interact with artificial intelligence — which should put entertainment businesses on alert for compliance, says Evynne Grover at QBE.

  • Googling Prospective Jurors Is Usually A Fool's Errand

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    Though a Massachusetts federal court recently barred Google from Googling potential jurors in a patent infringement case, the company need not worry about missing evidence of bias, because internet research of jury pools usually doesn’t yield the most valuable information — voir dire and questionnaires do, says Sarah Murray at Trialcraft.

  • A Look Into How Jurors Reach High Damages Awards

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    In the wake of several large jury awards, Richard Gabriel and Emily Shaw at Decision Analysis shed light on challenges that jurors have in deciding them, the nonevidentiary and extra-legal methods they use to do so, and new research about the themes and jury characteristics of high-damages jurors.

  • What To Know About WDTX Standing Order For Patent Cases

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    Patent litigators should review and ensure compliance with the standing order recently issued by U.S. District Judge Alan Albright of the Western District of Texas — a popular patent litigation venue — which encompasses new deadlines, seeks to streamline discovery disputes, and further reflects the court's existing practices, says Archibald Cruz at Patterson + Sheridan.

  • 10 Lessons From A Deep Dive Into IP Damages

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    Decisions on challenging an intellectual property expert's opinion can benefit from the in-depth study of court rulings on admissibility grounds, where the findings include the fact that patent cases see the most challenges of any IP area, say Deepa Sundararaman and Cleve Tyler at Berkeley Research.

  • Managing Competing Priorities In Witness Preparation

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    There’s often a divide between what attorneys and witnesses want out of the deposition process, but litigation teams can use several strategies to resolve this tension and help witnesses be more comfortable with the difficult conditions of testifying, say Ava Hernández and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

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