Legal Ethics

  • April 16, 2024

    Illinois Panel OKs Liability Ruling Against Discovery-Faking Firm

    An Illinois trial court was right to slap an attorney with a default judgment in a professional negligence suit brought by a former client after the attorney and his firm repeatedly "fabricated their expert witness disclosures 'from whole cloth,'" an appellate panel has ruled.

  • April 16, 2024

    Focus On Prosecutor Will Set Ga. Trump Jury Questions Apart

    The jury questionnaire currently before hundreds of Manhattan residents in Donald Trump's first criminal trial will serve as a partial blueprint for his upcoming election interference case in Georgia, experts told Law360, with at least one significant difference: a sharp focus on the Fulton County case's high-profile, controversial prosecutor.

  • April 15, 2024

    Justices Face Off Over Shadow Docket Procedures

    The U.S. Supreme Court's internal disagreements over how to manage its emergency docket were on full display Monday in its decision allowing Idaho to enforce a ban on gender-affirming care for minors — a case the court's liberals said wasn't worthy of their intervention, but its conservatives touted as a win in the fight against universal injunctions.

  • April 15, 2024

    Tax Attys, Broker Peddled 'Financial Fantasy,' NC Jury Told

    A North Carolina federal jury on Monday heard a series of secret recordings at the start of a tax fraud trial in which an insurance agent and a St. Louis attorney unwittingly pitched an undercover IRS agent on a way to decrease taxable income — or what the government characterized as a "financial fantasy."

  • April 15, 2024

    Trump Tells Justices Impeachment Required For Prosecution

    Former President Donald Trump told the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday that the "inevitably and unavoidably" political nature of prosecuting a former president requires input from Congress, arguing the U.S. Constitution's framers carefully wrote the impeachment clause to act as an initial hurdle for criminal prosecutions.

  • April 15, 2024

    Giuliani Can't Dodge $148M Defamation Verdict, Judge Says

    A D.C. federal judge on Monday refused to disturb a jury verdict directing Rudy Giuliani to pay $148 million to two Georgia election workers whom he falsely accused of committing ballot fraud in the 2020 presidential election, saying the former New York City mayor and Trump ally hasn't offered any reason to modify the jurors' decision or hold a new trial.

  • April 15, 2024

    Dueling Bills Highlight Partisan Divide Over 'Judge Shopping'

    Dueling proposals to limit so-called judge shopping were unveiled by Senate party leaders last week, sparking optimism that Congress will rein in plaintiffs' ability to bring cases before judges they think will be friendly to their views, while others raised questions about the proposals' feasibility.

  • April 15, 2024

    L'Occitane Privacy Suit Against Zimmerman Reed Trimmed

    A Los Angeles federal court is weighing ending a suit by L'Occitane against Zimmerman Reed LLP and thousands of clients who complained that the company's website tracking tools violated their online privacy, after denying a bid by defendants to compel arbitration and tossing a claim that Zimmerman Reed violated the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.

  • April 15, 2024

    Ohio IP Firm Beats Appeal In $42K Billing Fight

    An Ohio state appeals court has left intact a nearly $42,000 judgment Amin Turocy & Watson LLP won in a billing dispute with a client, reasoning that the materials Just Funky provided to fight the firm's summary judgment bid lacked the necessary detail.

  • April 15, 2024

    DC Judge Blocks Texas AG's Media Matters Investigation

    A D.C. federal judge issued a preliminary injunction blocking Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton from investigating Media Matters over its reporting on the X social media platform, ruling that the probe deterred the progressive media watchdog's "core First Amendment activities."

  • April 15, 2024

    Ex-Medical Co. GC's Suit Against Loeb & Loeb Gets Trimmed

    A Colorado federal court has narrowed a lawsuit by a former medical device company's in-house attorney against Loeb & Loeb LLP and an ex-firm attorney for pursuing claims on behalf of the business alleging that he stole its trade secrets.

  • April 15, 2024

    Attys In Google Maps Case Chided For Wordy Footnotes

    A California federal judge has flagged attorneys representing Google Maps customers in an antitrust action for submitting a filing with "numerous excessively long footnotes," and threatening sanctions if they don't provide a reasonable explanation to the court.

  • April 15, 2024

    McElroy Deutsch Must Turn Over Amex Info In Firing Suit

    One of the pair of married former McElroy Deutsch Mulvaney & Carpenter LLP executives accused of jointly stealing millions from the firm has prevailed on a bid for access to credit card statements from several firm leaders in her gender discrimination countersuit.

  • April 15, 2024

    Conn. Atty Aided $1.4M Transfer Scam, Developer Says

    Connecticut attorney Carole W. Briggs "intentionally orchestrated and participated in" a business email compromise scam that stole more than $1.4 million from a New Jersey-based real estate development company last year, according to a civil lawsuit in federal court.

  • April 15, 2024

    Long Island Debt Collector Settles Disabled Worker's Bias Suit

    A Long Island debt collection law firm told a New York federal judge it reached a settlement in principle Monday to end a former employee's suit alleging the firm discriminated against her by failing to give her accommodations after a car accident and then terminating her.

  • April 15, 2024

    Retired Atty Censured For Using Disbarred NJ Lawyer's Biz

    The New Jersey Supreme Court has censured a retired attorney for retaining a litigation support company run by an attorney who had been disbarred following his theft conviction, according to an order filed Monday.

  • April 15, 2024

    Conn. Attorney Says She'll End Defamation Lawsuit For $750K

    A Connecticut attorney who accused an acquaintance of commissioning and disseminating a background check that falsely called her a convicted drug dealer has told a Constitution State court that she would be willing to resolve her defamation claims if that acquaintance agrees to pay her $750,000.

  • April 15, 2024

    Ex-Calif. Bar Leader Loses Bid To Gut Ethics Case

    A California Bar Court has denied the latest attempt by former State Bar of California Executive Director Joe Dunn to sink an ethics case accusing him of improperly using bar funds to pay for a 2014 trip to Mongolia, finding the court already twice rejected his effort to dodge the claim and there was no reason to change course.

  • April 15, 2024

    California Judge Fights New Ethics Charges

    A California state judge on Friday responded to new ethics charges related to his participation in an online debate from his chambers and comments he made during a court hearing.

  • April 15, 2024

    Stressed About The Trump Trial? Imagine How The Attys Feel

    A trial-of-the-century moment like Donald Trump's New York criminal case heaps singular attention and pressure on the lawyers involved — and a commensurate need for smart stress relief tactics during months of prep, lawyers who have taken on landmark cases say.

  • April 15, 2024

    Justices Won't Review Ex-NYC Union Head's Bribery Rap

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to take up the appeal of a former New York City union president who was convicted of taking bribes from now-defunct hedge fund Platinum Partners, rejecting a petition that argued his attorney failed to tell him about the trial judge's conflicts of interest.

  • April 15, 2024

    Trump Accused Of Witness Threats As Jury Selection Begins

    The Manhattan district attorney's office on Monday asked the judge overseeing Donald Trump's hush money trial to find Trump in contempt for flouting the court's gag order barring witness intimidation, on day one of jury selection in the first criminal trial of a former U.S. president.

  • April 12, 2024

    Trump Can't Derail Hush Money Trial Over Media Saturation

    A New York judge overseeing Donald Trump's hush money case on Friday rejected another of the former president's bids to derail trial next week, waving off his complaints that prejudicial media coverage has tainted the jury pool.

  • April 12, 2024

    Fed. Circ.'s Fight With Newman: A Year In Review

    One year has passed since it came to light that the Federal Circuit's judges were investigating whether their colleague, U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman, was mentally competent to remain on the court. In that time, Judge Newman has garnered support from many in the patent community, but has faced a series of setbacks in her legal challenges.

  • April 12, 2024

    Fed. Circ.'s Competency Feud With Newman Turned Personal

    A year after the Federal Circuit publicly acknowledged its investigation into U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman's mental and physical competency, the nonagenarian still refuses to follow the court's medical testing orders and remains determined to reclaim her seat on the bench.

Expert Analysis

  • Considerations For Lawyer Witnesses After FTX Trial

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    Sam Bankman-Fried's recent trial testimony about his lawyers' involvement in FTX's business highlights the need for attorney-witnesses to understand privilege issues in order to avoid costly discovery disputes and, potentially, uncover critical evidence an adversary might seek to conceal, says Lawrence Bluestone at Genova Burns.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Opinion

    History Reveals Folly Of Absolute Presidential Immunity

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    As a federal appeals court grapples with former President Donald Trump’s claims that he’s immune from prosecution on election interference charges, it’s a fitting time for lawyers to reflect on the rule of law — from 13th century jurisprudence to Watergate and the Clinton impeachment — and how the idea of absolute presidential immunity is unwise, says attorney Steven Reske.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • Wachtell-X Ruling Highlights Trend On Arbitrability Question

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    A growing body of case law, including a California state court's recent decision in X Corp. v. Wachtell, holds that incorporation of specific arbitral body rules in an arbitration provision may in and of itself constitute clear and unmistakable evidence of delegation of arbitrability to an arbitrator, and thus such clauses should be drafted carefully, say attorneys at Norton Rose.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

  • On The Edge: Lessons In Patent Litigation Financing

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    A federal judge's recent request that the U.S. Department of Justice look into IP Edge patent litigation, and that counsel be disciplined, serves as a reminder for parties asserting intellectual property rights — and their attorneys — to exercise caution when structuring a litigation financing agreement, say Samuel Habein and James De Vellis at Foley & Lardner.

  • 5 Litigation Funding Trends To Note In 2024

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    Over the next year and beyond, litigation funding will continue to evolve in ways that affect attorneys and the larger litigation landscape, from the growth of a secondary market for funded claims, to rising interest rates restricting the availability of capital, says Jeffery Lula at GLS Capital.

  • Opinion

    Stronger Attorney Rules Are Needed To Avoid A Jan. 6 Repeat

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    Given the key role lawyers played in the events leading up to the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection, the legal profession must shore up its rules before this year’s presidential election to make clear that lawyers who undermine the rule of law will face severe penalties, including disbarment, says Ray Brescia at Albany Law School.

  • 4 Legal Ethics Considerations For The New Year

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    As attorneys and clients reset for a new year, now is a good time to take a step back and review some core ethical issues that attorneys should keep front of mind in 2024, including approaching generative artificial intelligence with caution and care, and avoiding pitfalls in outside counsel guidelines, say attorneys at HWG.

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