Media & Entertainment

  • April 01, 2024

    Skillz Hid 'Rudimentary' Gaming Tech, Investors Tell 9th Circ.

    Skillz Inc. investors urged the Ninth Circuit Monday to revive a consolidated proposed class action alleging the mobile-gaming company misled investors about its growth prospects surrounding its 2021 go-public merger with a special-purpose acquisition company — arguing Skillz skewed revenues and misleadingly touted its gaming technology, which was in reality "rudimentary."

  • April 01, 2024

    Digital Trade Groups Keep Pressing Biden To Oppose Barriers

    U.S. technology industry groups are maintaining pressure on the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative to stand up to foreign policies that limit or jeopardize access to export markets, especially in the burgeoning digital trade space.

  • April 01, 2024

    Trian Gains Support As Disney Proxy Contest Heats Up

    With The Walt Disney Company's annual shareholder meeting looming, activist investor Trian Fund Management is making one final push for its fellow shareholders to vote in favor of its director nominees, on Monday announcing its candidates have received support from two "respected" institutional investors.

  • April 01, 2024

    Dish Says Investor Suit's 'Witnesses Witnessed Nothing'

    Dish Network wants to dismiss a proposed shareholder class action accusing it of concealing its 5G network integration issues from investors, saying the court should ignore the testimonies of the suit's three confidential witnesses because they have no "basis of knowledge" of the company's inner workings.

  • April 01, 2024

    One Set Of Amazon Buyers Can't Cancel Later Antitrust Case

    Antitrust lawsuits against Amazon.com in New York and Washington federal court will remain separate after a New York federal judge refused Friday to let online shoppers in the earlier-filed Washington case intervene in — and junk — the other proposed class action filed two years later.

  • April 01, 2024

    Right-Wing Personality Hit With Severance Charge At NLRB

    Conservative media personality Steven Crowder was hit with a National Labor Relations Board charge alleging he's leaning on an illegal separation agreement in a suit to stop an ex-producer from speaking out about him.

  • April 01, 2024

    Trump Urges 11th Circ. To Revive $475M CNN Defamation Suit

    Donald Trump has asked the Eleventh Circuit to revive a $475 million defamation lawsuit the former president filed against CNN, alleging the network spent years "wrongfully Hitlerizing" him by calling his challenges to the 2020 election results his "Big Lie."

  • April 01, 2024

    Formula One Owner Buying MotoGP Racing Biz In $4.5B Deal

    Formula One owner Liberty Media Corp. said Monday that it had agreed to acquire MotoGP parent company Dorna Sports SL from Bridgepoint and the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board in a deal worth €4.2 billion ($4.5 billion). 

  • March 29, 2024

    Manhattan DA Says Trump Violated Hush Money Gag Order

    Donald Trump may have already violated a New York state judge's gag order in the former president's hush money case by impugning the judge's daughter on social media, Manhattan prosecutors said, while Trump's attorneys say prosecutors are trying to improperly expand the order.

  • March 29, 2024

    DC Circ. Rejects Meta's Bid To Delay FTC Privacy Tweaks

    A D.C. Circuit panel on Friday refused Meta Platforms Inc.'s bid to delay the Federal Trade Commission from pursuing changes to a $5 billion privacy settlement, saying the social media giant failed to show why it's entitled to an emergency injunction while it's challenging the FTC's structure.

  • March 29, 2024

    UTA's Atty Hit With $125M Suit Over 'Pathological Liar' Remark

    United Talent Agency's attorney has been accused of defaming MediaLink founder Michael Kassan by calling him a "pathological liar" in the press, according to a suit filed in Los Angeles County, the latest development in a fierce dispute that has seen UTA and Kassan accuse each other of fraud.

  • March 29, 2024

    X Corp. Still Must Face Breach Suit Over 200M Users

    A California federal judge on Friday trimmed a proposed class action alleging X Corp., the former Twitter Inc., failed to protect the data of 200 million users whose information was exposed in a data breach, allowing the users to amend some allegations while permanently tossing a California Consumers Legal Remedies Act claim.

  • March 29, 2024

    BitTorrent Owner Says SEC Is Overreaching Its Authority

    The owner of file sharing platform BitTorrent asked a Manhattan federal judge to toss the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's lawsuit alleging the fraudulent and unregistered sale of a pair of crypto tokens, saying the agency is trying to extend U.S. securities laws to foreign entities.

  • March 29, 2024

    Rural Carriers Worry FCC Broadband Maps 'Vastly' Inaccurate

    Rural wireless carriers are concerned Federal Communications Commission maps do not accurately depict where mobile broadband service is available, putting federal support funds at risk.

  • March 29, 2024

    Dem Cites 'Secret' Report Against Ticketmaster 'Rebates'

    A major congressional critic of Live Nation Entertainment Inc. and Ticketmaster highlighted an expert report from a long-running lawsuit as further proof of the ticketing juggernauts' "rampant, corrupt and abusive practices," although assertions that the report was secret and only newly unearthed may be overblown.

  • March 29, 2024

    In Pandora Win, Fed. Circ. Won't Revive Playlist Patents

    The Federal Circuit on Friday declined to revive a collection of patents on generating playlists that were issued to an early, erstwhile executive at Amazon and were asserted in a failed lawsuit against music streaming website Pandora.

  • March 29, 2024

    UK Photog Tells Judge Napster License Didn't Cover Original Art

    A British photographer told a Washington federal judge Friday that Napster's promotion of a reggae record infringed his copyright for the photo used on the album cover, arguing that even though he licensed the album art to a record company, the music streamer did not have rights to the photo itself.

  • March 29, 2024

    NTIA Issues $811M In State Digital Equity Funding

    The Biden administration is releasing the allocation of the first $811 million of the $1.25 billion in digital equity funding it plans on providing states, territories and tribes to ensure everyone within their borders has the ability and skill to access all the internet has to offer.

  • March 29, 2024

    Nikola Says Convicted Ex-CEO Plotting Illegal Board Takeover

    Electric truck manufacturer Nikola Corp. sued its former CEO and convicted felon Trevor Milton in Arizona federal court Friday, accusing him of scheming with unqualified loyalists to regain control of the company by flouting securities laws, infringing Nikola's trademarks and breaching agreements.

  • March 29, 2024

    Attys Dodge Sanctions Over Microsoft Word Error, Judge Rules

    An error in an attorney's Microsoft Word settings made sanctions against two firms for filing oversized briefs while representing High 5 Games in a consumer protection class action unnecessary, a Washington federal judge ruled Thursday.

  • March 29, 2024

    FuboTV Exits Investor Suit Over Sports Betting Biz, For Now

    A New York federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit from investors of sports streaming service FuboTV Inc. accusing it of misleading them about its attempt to enter into the sports betting business, saying that claims in short seller reports, which the investors say damaged share prices, are only opinions, not actionable facts.

  • March 29, 2024

    'Rust' Movie Armorer Denied New Trial, Remains Jailed

    A New Mexico state judge on Friday rejected "Rust" armorer Hannah Gutierrez-Reed's emergency motion to be released from custody and given a new trial based on what her attorneys argued were erroneous jury instructions leading to her conviction over the on-set shooting death of a cinematographer.

  • March 29, 2024

    Off The Bench: Ohtani Woes, Va. Ends Arena Plan, Pac-12 Deal

    In this week’s Off The Bench, MLB superstar Shohei Ohtani tries to untangle himself from a gambling scandal, Virginia’s rejection sends two D.C. pro franchises back home, and the Pac-12 pays up to two schools that were left behind. If you were sidelined this week, Law360 will catch you up with the sports and betting stories that had our readers talking.

  • March 28, 2024

    Disney Shareholder Demands To See Books Amid Board Row

    An affiliate of Walt Disney Co. shareholder Blackwells Capital on Thursday asked Delaware's Court of the Chancery to force Disney to open its books and records as the investor looks into potential wrongdoing and mismanagement stemming from the entertainment giant's dealings with ValueAct Capital.

  • March 28, 2024

    UMG Wants Out Of Diddy Producer's Sex Assault Litigation

    UMG Recordings has asked a New York federal court to free it from a producer's suit claiming he was sexually assaulted and harassed while working on Sean 'Diddy' Combs' latest album, slamming the suit as riddled with "knowingly false allegations" that publicly smear the music company.

Expert Analysis

  • FTC Warning Letters Note 5 Mistakes For Influencers To Avoid

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    The Federal Trade Commission recently sent warning letters to two trade associations and 12 health influencers over their social media posts, offering insight into how the agency plans to enforce its updated endorsement guides and highlighting five concerns to keep in mind for marketing campaigns, says Gonzalo Mon at Kelley Drye.

  • Opinion

    A Telecom Attorney's Defense Of The Chevron Doctrine

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    The Chevron doctrine, which requires judicial deference to federal regulators, is under attack in two U.S. Supreme Court cases — and while most telecom attorneys likely agree that the Federal Communications Commission is guilty of overrelying on it, the problem is not the doctrine itself, says Carl Northrop at Telecommunications Law Professionals.

  • Seized Art Ownership Row Highlights Importance Of Vetting

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    The Cleveland Museum of Art's recent suit against the Manhattan District Attorney's Office to block a seizure order and contest its rightful ownership of a headless statue worth $20 million presents an uncommon challenge that underscores the criticality of due diligence prior to acquiring artworks, especially older pieces, say Robert Darwell and Zach Dai at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • 'Trump Too Small' Args Show Justices Inclined To Reverse

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently heard oral arguments in the "Trump Too Small" trademark case Vidal v. Elster — and the tenor of the justices' feedback makes it clear that the refusal to register a mark under the Lanham Act most likely does not violate free speech rights, as opposed to the Federal Circuit's decision last year, says Brian Brookey at Tucker Ellis.

  • What Cos. Should Know About FTC's Proposed Junk Fee Rule

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    The Federal Trade Commission recently announced a notice of proposed rulemaking targeting junk fees and how businesses may advertise prices to consumers — and since it would give the agency powers to seek monetary penalties against businesses that do not comply, companies should look to get ahead now, say Phyllis Marcus and Nicole Johnson at Hunton Andrews.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Opinion

    What 5th Circ. Uncrewed Aircraft Systems Ruling Got Wrong

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent ruling in National Press Photographers Association v. McGraw threatens to dilute the First Amendment rights of photographers using uncrewed aircraft systems and undermine federal control of the airspace, and is indicative of how other courts may misinterpret the Federal Aviation Administration's new fact sheet down the line, say attorneys at Wiley Rein.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: South Korea

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    Numerous ESG trends have materialized in South Korea in the past three years, with impacts ranging from greenwashing prevention and carbon neutrality measures to workplace harassment and board diversity initiatives, say Chang Wook Min and Hyun Chan Jung at Jipyong.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

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    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • Young Thug Case Spotlights Debate Over Lyric Admissibility

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    A Georgia court’s recent ruling, allowing prosecutors to use some of rapper Young Thug’s lyrics in his conspiracy trial, captures the ongoing debate about whether rap lyrics are admissible, with courts often stretching the boundaries of the federal evidence rules, say Amy Buice at Smith Gambrell and Emily Ward at Continuum Legal Group.

  • Del. Dispatch: Refining M&A Terms After Twitter Investor Suit

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    The Delaware Court of Chancery's recent decision in Crispo v. Musk — invalidating a merger agreement provision that has been commonly used to disincentivize buyers from wrongful merger termination — should cause target companies to consider new approaches to ensure the payment of lost premium damages, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • First-Of-Its-Kind Artist AI Ruling Offers Liability Guidance

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    A California judge recently became the first federal judge in Andersen v. Stability AI to rule at the pleading stage on a challenge to claims that training artificial intelligence models involves mass-scale copyright infringement, providing insight into the potential legal exposure of AI-enabled products, say attorneys at Fenwick.

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