Media & Entertainment

  • February 22, 2024

    AMC Fall Suit Earlier Tossed After 5-Year Deadline Is Revived

    A California appeals court has revived a woman's claims that she tripped and fell at an AMC Entertainment Inc. theater, finding the trial court didn't give her adequate notice of a motion to dismiss based on the state's five-year trial deadline.

  • February 22, 2024

    Deals Rumor Mill: Occidental, Kroger-Albertsons, BuzzFeed

    Occidental explores a $20 billion sale of Western Midstream, the FTC and some states could sue to block the $24.6 billion Kroger-Albertsons deal, and The Independent is taking over BuzzFeed's U.K. and Irish operations. Here, Law360 breaks down the notable deal rumors from the past week.

  • February 21, 2024

    Aerosmith's Steven Tyler Beats NY Sex Assault Suit, For Now

    A New York federal judge tossed a former teen model's sexual assault lawsuit accusing Aerosmith front man Steven Tyler of groping and kissing her in public without her consent, finding Wednesday that the lawsuit is untimely and doesn't allege a "serious risk of physical injury" to state a claim.

  • February 21, 2024

    Calif. Chamber Takes Privacy Regs Fight To State High Court

    The California Chamber of Commerce is pressing the state's Supreme Court to overturn a ruling that allows California's new data privacy agency to begin enforcing regulations it has finalized, arguing that there's "no way" state voters envisioned companies having less than a year to comply with the rules.  

  • February 21, 2024

    Supertramp's Ex-Drummer Says Royalty Deal Was For Good

    Supertramp's former drummer took the stand Wednesday in a breach of contract suit he and two other former band members brought against co-songwriter Roger Hodgson, telling a California federal jury that a 1977 agreement for all members to receive a piece of songwriting royalties was meant to be permanent.

  • February 21, 2024

    FTC Says Twitter Staff Prevented Musk Violating Privacy Order

    The Federal Trade Commission told the House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday that were it not for Twitter employees disobeying Elon Musk's orders to grant some reporters "full access to everything ... no limits at all" to the social media platform's systems, the company may have violated a 2022 FTC consent decree.

  • February 21, 2024

    Mother Defeats Daughter's 'Que Sera, Sera' Royalties Suit

    A federal judge in Tennessee told the granddaughter of one of the Oscar-winning songwriters behind "Que Sera, Sera" on Wednesday that she should have simply said whatever will be, will be in a feud with her mother over splitting royalties that were already decided by a probate court over two decades ago.

  • February 21, 2024

    Ill. Court Vacates R. Kelly Victim's $4M Default Judgment

    An Illinois appellate court has thrown out a $4 million default judgment won by a woman who claimed jailed former R&B star R. Kelly physically and sexually abused her, saying certain procedural rules were not appropriately followed. 

  • February 21, 2024

    'Cyber Trust Mark' Will Get Vote At Next FCC Meeting

    The proposed "U.S. Cyber Trust Mark" for "smart" products will come up for a vote at the Federal Communications Commission next month, FCC Chair Jessica Rosenworcel said Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    Google Judge Slams Lack Of User Choice, Mulls Privacy Cert.

    A California federal judge on Wednesday appeared open to certifying a class of potentially tens of millions of Google account holders alleging Google's ad auction practices violate privacy rights, doubting that users consented to data-sharing if they couldn't opt out and telling Google's counsel, "there's no transparency and there's no choice."

  • February 21, 2024

    Justices Offer Conflicting Clues In Copyright Damages Fight

    U.S. Supreme Court justices hearing a case over damages in copyright disputes gave conflicting hints Wednesday about where they stand on the discovery rule, a judicially created doctrine that allows claims to accrue when plaintiffs learn of alleged infringement.

  • February 21, 2024

    ByteDance Can't Arbitrate Ex-Coder's Wrongful Firing Suit

    A California federal judge declined to send a former ByteDance Inc. engineer's wrongful termination suit to arbitration, writing in a ruling made public Tuesday that there are factual disputes over whether he signed employment agreements containing arbitration clauses, saying the matter should be resolved via a jury trial.

  • February 21, 2024

    Justices Turn Away Meta Bid To End Ad Discrimination Suit

    A proposed class action accusing Facebook owner Meta of permitting discrimination in choices regarding which users could see housing ads appears headed for discovery after the U.S. Supreme Court denied the company's petition to appeal a split Ninth Circuit ruling.

  • February 21, 2024

    'No Theft' Of Eagles Lyrics, Trio Says As NY Trial Opens

    Three men accused of trying to sell stolen draft lyrics from the classic Eagles album "Hotel California" told a New York state judge presiding over their criminal bench trial on Wednesday that there was "no theft" and that prosecutors owed them an apology.

  • February 21, 2024

    Twitter Severance Fight Paused To Facilitate Settlement Talks

    X Corp., the social media entity formerly known as Twitter, and a group of ex-employees have paused their dispute over severance compensation, as a Delaware federal court signed off Wednesday on a proposal to stay litigation deadlines pending settlement talks.

  • February 21, 2024

    9th Circ. Affirms $90M Facebook Privacy Deal Over Objections

    A Ninth Circuit panel affirmed a $90 million class settlement on Wednesday to resolve allegations that Facebook illegally tracked logged-out users' browsing activity, calling two objectors' suggestion that the company faced $1.24 trillion in statutory damages "an unreasonable baseline that would violate due process."

  • February 21, 2024

    FCC Commissioner To Meet With Indian Gov't On TikTok Ban

    FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr is finally getting the chance to chat with Indian officials about the country's decision to ban TikTok over concerns about the Chinese government's influence over the app, a decision he has pushed for here in the United States, during a visit to India.

  • February 21, 2024

    FCC Considers Adding Missing Persons To Emergency Alerts

    The Federal Communications Commission plans to introduce a new code to the Emergency Alert System to allow information about missing or endangered persons to be widely disseminated.

  • February 21, 2024

    FCC Looks To Finalize 'All-In' Cable Pricing Disclosures

    The Federal Communications Commission plans to vote next month on controversial rules to require cable companies to post "all-in" prices on marketing materials and subscriber bills.

  • February 21, 2024

    AT&T Says Satellite Cell Coverage Must Rely On Leases

    The Federal Communications Commission will soon vote on new rules allowing satellite companies to use spectrum to beef up mobile connectivity, helping eliminate "dead zones."

  • February 21, 2024

    Mark Geragos Owes LA Times $218K In Fees Over Libel Suit

    Attorney Mark Geragos must pay the Los Angeles Times $218,000 in attorney fees and costs after the paper defeated his libel suit challenging its coverage of a settlement for Armenian genocide victims, a California state judge said, rejecting Geragos' contention that the defendants "are seeking a windfall."

  • February 21, 2024

    How Trump's Hush Money Trial Helps Or Hurts Jack Smith

    Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg's porn star hush money case against Donald Trump is set to be the first criminal trial of a former president in U.S. history, a development that carries potential risks and benefits for special counsel Jack Smith, especially as one expert characterized the New York case as "legally and factually weak."

  • February 21, 2024

    NY Judge Trims American Idol Singer's Suit Against NY Atty

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday trimmed a suit against an attorney from a former American Idol contestant, allowing the artist to proceed only with her breach of fiduciary duty and faithless servant claims.

  • February 21, 2024

    Calif. AG Settles With DoorDash Over Marketing Data Sale

    DoorDash will pay $375,000 to resolve the California attorney general's claims that the food delivery service violated the state's landmark consumer privacy law by failing to clearly inform users of their ability to opt out of the sale of their personal information to a marketing vendor, the agency announced Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    Giuliani Seeks New Trial, Will Appeal $148M Defamation Award

    Rudy Giuliani is urging a Washington, D.C., federal judge to rethink a jury verdict directing him to pay $148 million to two Georgia election workers he was found liable for defaming as he tees up an appeal of the jury award to the D.C. Circuit.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Unraveling The Bundled Benefits Of Retail Memberships

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    The recent prevalence of paid retail memberships and the associated findings of a consumer survey suggest that assessing consumer preferences and welfare may be important when considering resolution mechanisms in antitrust contexts, say Rosa M. Abrantes-Metz at Berkeley Research Group, Mame Maloney at The Brattle Group and Jeff Brazell at the University of Utah.

  • NC TikTok Order Holds Lessons On Handling State AG Probes

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    Earlier this month, a North Carolina appeals court compelled TikTok to give the state attorney general information relating to 98,000 recorded Zoom meetings, reminding companies that successful civil litigation strategies may have the opposite effect in the state or regulatory investigation context, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Del. Dispatch: Efforts Clause Trumps Contractual Right

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    The Delaware Court of Chancery's Chordia v. Lee ruling this month — that the efforts clause set forth in a stockholders' agreement overrode the acquired company's right to fire its officers and employees — highlights key considerations for parties in such agreements to avoid post-acquisition disputes, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

  • The 7th Circ.'s Top 10 Civil Opinions Of 2023

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    Attorneys at Jenner & Block examine the most significant decisions issued by the Seventh Circuit in 2023, and explain how they may affect issues related to antitrust, constitutional law, federal jurisdiction and more.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • How Consumer Product Cos. Can Keep Up With Class Actions

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    Recent cases show California's federal courts and the Ninth Circuit remain the preferred arena for consumers pursuing false advertising and trade deception claims against companies — so manufacturers, distributors and retailers of consumer products should continue to watch these courts for guidance on how to fight class actions, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Canada

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    In Canada, multiple statutes, regulations, common law and industry guidance address environmental, social and governance considerations, with debate over ESG in the business realm potentially growing on the horizon, say attorneys at Blakes.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • The Section 230 Immunity Provision Debate Continues

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    The Fifth Circuit last month voted in Doe v. Snap Inc. not to reconsider en banc its decade-old interpretation of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which generally allows websites to police objectionable content as they see fit — but a growing number of judges appear motivated to further limit the scope of its immunity, say Jordan Rice and Caleb Hayes-Deats at MoloLamken.

  • 5 AI Risks For Corporate Boards To Examine

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    Whether companies are building their own artificial intelligence technology or leveraging third-party tools, their directors should get educated on certain legal issues and business risks to ensure the adoption of policies that foster responsible use of generative AI, say James Gatto and Tiana Garbett at Sheppard Mullin.

  • What To Keep Tabs On In The NIL Arena This Year

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    The past year brought significant developments to name, image and likeness in the realm of college sports, making it increasingly important for lawyers to be well-versed in contracts, intellectual property and litigation as the new year unfolds, says Janet Moreira at Caldera Law.

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