Media & Entertainment

  • February 16, 2024

    Off The Bench: NHL Antitrust, Daily Fantasy Dread, ESPN Bet

    In this week's Off the Bench, the NHL faces allegations of a vast, exploitative antitrust scheme, daily fantasy operators continue facing heat from state regulators, and New York gets a new sports betting player as ESPN Bet hits the Empire State.

  • February 16, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    News broke last week that Delaware's Court of Chancery will say goodbye to its current longest-serving jurist, a development that quickly overshadowed a busy week of new merger and board disputes, fee rulings, settlements, and books-and-records demands.

  • February 16, 2024

    Texas Justices Ax ADA's Defamation Suit Against Newspaper

    The Texas Supreme Court on Friday reversed a state appellate decision in a case involving a small-town newspaper, an infamous wrongful conviction and a publicly snubbed assistant district attorney, ruling that the case should have been dismissed and that the Polk County Publishing Co.'s characterization of the assistant DA was legal.

  • February 16, 2024

    Trump Owes $355M For Fraud That 'Shocks The Conscience'

    A New York state judge on Friday found Donald Trump, his adult sons, his companies and longtime executives liable for a decadelong valuation fraud conspiracy, ordering the defendants to disgorge $364 million in ill-gotten gains to the state, plus interest, with the former president on the hook for the lion's share.

  • February 16, 2024

    Gibson Dunn, DLA Piper Steer $1.45B Sale Of All3Media

    RedBird IMI, advised by Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP, on Friday revealed that it has agreed to buy independent television production and distribution company All3Media from its joint owners, DLA Piper-led Warner Bros. Discovery Inc. and Liberty Global Ltd., in a £1.15 billion ($1.45 billion) deal that will allow the independent production company to continue developing and producing programming.

  • February 16, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen a legal battle erupt between JPMorgan and the founder of a Greek payments company following a dispute over the valuation of their jointly owned fintech business, the children of late Russian oligarch Vladimir Scherbakov face a claim by Fieldfisher LLP, the Director of Education and Training at the Solicitors Regulation Authority tackle a claim by two solicitors, and train operator First MTR South Western Trains file a claim against a security company. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • February 15, 2024

    FTC Seeks To Crack Down On Using AI To Impersonate People

    The Federal Trade Commission on Thursday moved to broaden its recently finalized rule to combat government and business impersonation schemes to also cover scammers that use emerging artificial intelligence tools and other methods to impersonate individuals. 

  • February 15, 2024

    Justices To Hear IP Case That Could Cap Copyright Payouts

    Payouts in copyright disputes could be capped to three years from the date of alleged infringement or go back much further after the U.S. Supreme Court considers the long-lingering question of whether the statute of limitations on copyright restricts damages.

  • February 15, 2024

    X Corp. Nears Toss Of Breach Suit Over 200M Users, For Now

    A California magistrate judge said Thursday she plans to toss a proposed class action alleging the social media giant X Corp. failed to protect the data of 200 million Twitter users whose information was exposed following a data breach, but said she'll let plaintiffs amend the complaint and try again.

  • February 15, 2024

    IP Forecast: 'No Labels' Party Feuds With Website Over Name

    In advance of debuting candidates for its promised "Unity Ticket for 2024," third-party political group No Labels will fight next week with a website's owners who say the group's name is merely a generic phrase any candidate can use. Here's a look at that case — plus all the other major intellectual property matters on deck in the coming week.

  • February 15, 2024

    Biz Groups Urge Feds To Back WTO's Block On Digital Duties

    Major U.S. trade and business groups, including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Foreign Trade Council, urged U.S. officials to back the World Trade Organization's suspension of tariffs on electronic transmissions ahead of a renewal vote later this month.

  • February 15, 2024

    America First Legal Says Disney Favors Women, Minorities

    A group founded by former Trump adviser Stephen Miller accused the Walt Disney Co. of discriminating against white men in its hiring and promotion decisions and on Wednesday asked the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to investigate.

  • February 15, 2024

    FCC To Expand Emergency Alerts In Multiple Languages

    The Federal Communications Commission proposed new rules Thursday that would make it easier to broadcast emergency alerts in multiple languages on TV and radio.

  • February 15, 2024

    DraftKings Paying $750M For Lottery App Jackpocket

    Digital sports and gambling company DraftKings Inc. said Thursday it has agreed to acquire U.S. lottery app Jackpocket for approximately $750 million, with Sullivan & Cromwell LLP and Cooley LLP representing the parties on the cash-and-stock deal. 

  • February 15, 2024

    Trian Decries Disney's 'Spaghetti-Against-The-Wall' Strategy

    Walt Disney Co. shareholder and activist investor The Trian Group is taking a public swipe at the company's performance, criticizing its "fairy tale" and "spaghetti-against-the-wall" strategy to improve profits.

  • February 15, 2024

    'Romeo & Juliet' Stars Sue Paramount Again Over Nude Scene

    "Romeo & Juliet" actors Olivia Hussey and Leonard Whiting on Wednesday sued Paramount Pictures again in California state court for rereleasing the 1968 film adaption of William Shakespeare's tragedy that included a nude scene, this time arguing they never consented to the redistribution of the content for the February 2023 rerelease.

  • February 15, 2024

    Tax On Tribune's Cubs Sale Troubling, 7th Circ. Judge Says

    A Seventh Circuit judge said Thursday he was troubled by an IRS push to tax Tribune Media Co. on some gains from its sale of the Chicago Cubs that stemmed from a $425 million debt transaction, saying the agency seemed to ignore the relevant legal test.

  • February 15, 2024

    'Jock Tax' Is Constitutional, Pittsburgh Tells Pa. Justices

    The Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court erred by ruling Pittsburgh's fee on nonresident professional athletes violates the state constitution's uniformity clause, the city told the Pennsylvania Supreme Court.

  • February 15, 2024

    Stanford Prof Must Pay Atty Fees In Dropped Defamation Suit

    A Stanford University professor who sued critics of his renewable energy research must pay more than $500,000 in attorney fees despite dropping the litigation, the D.C. Court of Appeals ruled Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    Trump Social Media Blank-Check Merger Gets SEC Approval

    The blank-check company looking to take former President Donald Trump's social media platform public has obtained approval from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to move forward with the long-delayed merger, according to a recent regulatory filing.

  • February 15, 2024

    Deals Rumor Mill: Sony-Michael Jackson, Inspire IPO, Walmart

    Sony plans to acquire half of Michael Jackson's catalog; private equity firm Roark Capital is planning to list Inspire Brands, which owns Dunkin' and other food chains; and Walmart is pursuing an acquisition of TV maker Vizio. Here, Law360 breaks down these and other notable deal rumors from the past week.

  • February 15, 2024

    Trump Gets March 25 Trial Date In NY Hush Money Case

    The Manhattan district attorney's hush money case against Donald Trump is on track to be the first of the former president's four criminal matters to go to trial, after a state judge on Thursday denied his motion to dismiss the charges and confirmed a March 25 date for jury selection.

  • February 14, 2024

    NY Top Court Weighs Weinstein's 'Prior Bad Acts' Evidence

    New York's highest court asked tough questions of all sides as they heard former Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein's appeal of his rape conviction Wednesday, focusing on whether it was fair to present accusations of uncharged crimes to the jury.

  • February 14, 2024

    Network Group Wants Faster Access To Utility Poles

    Federal regulators must push for further reforms in order to expedite talks between utility pole owners and high-speed equipment attachers on how to divvy up pole upgrade costs, a broadband trade group said.

  • February 14, 2024

    'Addictive' Tinder, Hinge Apps Break Hearts, V-Day Suit Says

    Match Group intentionally designs its Tinder and Hinge dating apps to be addictive in order to lock users into a "perpetual pay-to-play loop," prioritizing profits over its marketing promises of helping people make romantic connections, according to a proposed class action filed in California federal court on Valentine's Day.

Expert Analysis

  • A Former Bankruptcy Judge Talks 2023 High Court Rulings

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    In 2023, the U.S. Supreme Court issued four bankruptcy law opinions — an extraordinary number — and a close look at these cases signals that changes to the U.S. Bankruptcy Code will have to come from Congress, not the courts, says Phillip Shefferly at the University of Michigan Law School.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • A Review Of 2023's Most Notable Securities Litigation

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    There is much to be learned from the most prominent private securities cases of 2023, specifically the Tesla trial, the U.S. Supreme Court's Slack decision and the resolution of Goldman Sachs litigation, but one lesson running through all of them is that there can be rewards at the end of the line for defendants willing to go the distance, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

  • Issues High Court Is Weighing In Gov't Social Media Cases

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    Two U.S. Supreme Court cases aim to resolve a circuit split on whether public officials who block commenters from their personally created accounts are acting "under color of" state law, and the justices are grappling with determining how canonical legal principles will fit into a shifting landscape driven by advances in technology, says Alyssa Howard at Zuckerman Spaeder.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • 7 Enforcement Predictions For US Export Controls, Sanctions

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    Federal agencies' assertions of coming increases in export-control and sanctions-violations enforcement are not new, but recent improvements in resources and inter-agency cooperation allow for certain predictions about how the administration’s latest approach to enforcement may be applied going forward, say attorneys at Akin.

  • Insurer's '600-Lb. Life' Win Shows Why Fraud Suits Don't Stick

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    A Texas federal court’s recent ruling that Philadelphia Indemnity Co. did not fraudulently induce Megalomedia, the production company behind reality show “My 600-Lb. Life,” into purchasing insurance, demonstrates why a policyholder’s fraudulent inducement claim against an insurer will rarely succeed, says Robert Tugander at Rivkin Radler.

  • 3 Types Of Evidence Excluded Pretrial In 2023 TM Cases

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    Dylan I. Scher at Quinn Emanuel reviews three areas of rulings on motions in limine from 2023 where parties successfully excluded evidence in a trademark dispute, for legal practitioners to consider for future cases.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Singapore

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    Singapore is keen to establish itself as a leading international financial center and a key player in the sustainable finance ecosystem, and key initiatives led by its government and other regulatory bodies have helped the Asian nation progress from its initially guarded attitude toward ESG investment and reporting, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Reading The Fine Print On FDA's Prescription Drug Ad Rule

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    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's new final rule regarding the disclosure of risks and side effects in ads for prescription drugs includes some broad and potentially subjective language, and some missed opportunities to address how traditional media formats have changed in recent years, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Comparing Christmas Carols: IP Issues In Mariah Carey Case

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    All that plaintiffs Andy Stone and Troy Powers want for Christmas this year is $20 million in damages from Mariah Carey in a federal copyright suit claiming her hit "All I Want For Christmas Is You" infringed on their earlier song by the same name, but they will have an uphill battle in demonstrating substantial similarity, says forensic musicologist Ethan Lustig.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • 7 Critical Copyright And AI Questions Courts Need To Address

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    U.S. courts have yet to rule on many copyright issues regarding generative artificial intelligence technologies, so developers and users should consider several questions when evaluating risks, developing risk mitigation plans and making decisions about particular use cases, say John Delaney and Sean West at Perkins Coie.

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