Media & Entertainment

  • February 14, 2024

    FCC Nixes NM Schools' Bid For Cancelled Radio Stations

    The Albuquerque Board of Education has no relationship with the person who surrendered two radio station licenses and, therefore, cannot petition the Federal Communications Commission to undo that decision and hand the licenses over to them as "trustees," the agency has declared.

  • February 14, 2024

    FCC Must Distribute School IT Funds, Tech Firms Tell DC Circ.

    Two tech companies are calling on the D.C. Circuit to force the Federal Communications Commission to release funds to pay for information technology and broadband services the firms provide in elementary and secondary schools around the country.

  • February 14, 2024

    Google Again Targets 'Strategic' Texas AGs' Ad Tech Delays

    Google is hoping a newly appointed special master can finally force a coalition of state attorneys general led by Texas to hand over "fundamental information" it said Tuesday has long been improperly withheld from one of three cases targeting its dominance over display advertising placement auction technology.

  • February 14, 2024

    NYC Sues Facebook, Social Media Cos. Over Teen Addiction

    New York City on Wednesday became the latest government entity to accuse social media giants such as Facebook, TikTok and YouTube of purposefully hooking youth on their platforms and driving a mental health care crisis by designing their apps to mimic gambling and tobacco industry tactics in a California state court suit.

  • February 14, 2024

    Google, Apple Users Ask 9th Circ. To Revive Video Data Fight

    Google and Apple consumers urged the Ninth Circuit Wednesday to revive separate proposed class actions alleging that the tech giants violated New York and Minnesota state statutes by unlawfully retaining personally identifiable information collected in connection with video streaming rentals, arguing both statutes create a private right of action.

  • February 14, 2024

    Breach Of Contract Claims Trimmed In $30M GameStop Suit

    A Delaware federal court dropped some allegations related to the breach of contract claims against GameStop in a $30 million fee dispute, saying the plaintiff, Boston Consulting Group, has not pled a viable claim in some instances despite having three chances to do so.

  • February 14, 2024

    Music Licensor Sues Restaurant For Performing Disco Songs

    A New York music licensor has hit a Detroit-area restaurant with a copyright suit over the unauthorized performance of three 1970s-era disco songs by artists like the Bee Gees and KC and the Sunshine Band, telling the Michigan court that it had reached out to the dining establishment over 50 times ahead of filing its claims.

  • February 14, 2024

    Albright Snubs Plea That Meta Transfer Will Doom EDTX Suits

    Western District of Texas Judge Alan Albright has rejected an oil field equipment supplier's objections to a magistrate judge's ruling that transferred a patent case against Meta from the Lone Star State to California, saying the objections don't have merit.

  • February 14, 2024

    'Rust' Armorer, Atty Responsible For Text Leak, Judge Rules

    A New Mexico judge declined Wednesday to dismiss the involuntary manslaughter case against "Rust" film weapons expert Hannah Gutierrez-Reed, finding that she and her attorney are to blame for a leak of their private cellphone communications.

  • February 14, 2024

    Netflix, Hulu Owe Fees Like Cable Cos., Calif. City Argues

    Streaming services such as Netflix and Hulu are using public rights of way in California, which means localities can compel them to pay service provider fees as cable companies do, a California city argued before a state appeals court panel.

  • February 14, 2024

    Chancery Flipped SeaWorld Stock Claims, Ex-Execs Tell Court

    A Chancery Court judge "got it backwards" when he concluded that 19 former executives of SeaWorld Entertainment Inc. weren't entitled to vesting rights in connection with a 2017 stock sale, because he read the executives' separation and equity agreements out of order, an attorney for the executives told Delaware's Supreme Court on Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    Fox News' Sorrento Report Takes Center Stage At 9th Circ.

    Counsel for Sorrento Therapeutics Inc. investors urged the Ninth Circuit on Wednesday to revive a securities suit alleging executives made misleading statements to Fox News about its COVID-19 research, prompting one judge to ask whether "you have to take things you hear on Fox News with a grain of salt."

  • February 14, 2024

    Musk To Face Severance Fight In Del. Court After Stay Lifted

    A proposed class action claiming workers didn't receive their severance or were fired after Elon Musk acquired Twitter is back on track after a Delaware federal judge lifted a temporary stay Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    GoTV Asks For New Trial, Says Netflix 'Tainted' $2.5M Award

    GoTV Streaming LLC has asked a California court for a new damages trial after a jury found that Netflix owed the company only $2.5 million for infringing its wireless patent, arguing that Netflix misled the court and showed the jury evidence that artificially suppressed the award amount.

  • February 14, 2024

    TMZ Ordered To Pay $300K In Atty Fees Over Bus Tour Case

    A California federal judge on Monday ordered TMZ to reimburse a Hollywood bus tour operator almost $300,000 in attorney fees after the operator convinced the court to vacate an arbitration award favoring the celebrity news provider based on an arbitrator's failure to disclose relevant information.

  • February 14, 2024

    Insurer Wants Out Of Covering SC Club Shooting

    A Nationwide unit has told a South Carolina federal court it doesn't have to defend a nightclub operator against a former patron's negligence suit, arguing that an assault and battery exclusion in its liquor liability policy bars coverage for the claimant's shooting-related injuries.

  • February 13, 2024

    FTC's Monopolization Case Against Amazon Set For 2026 Trial

    A Washington federal judge has scheduled a bench trial in the Federal Trade Commission's landmark monopolization case against Amazon for early October 2026, according to an order issued Tuesday.

  • February 13, 2024

    Attys Must Reveal Possible Tie To 'Disturbing' Flint PR Move

    A Michigan federal judge on Tuesday tore into attorneys for a water engineering firm being sued for its alleged role in the Flint water crisis, warning them of severe repercussions if they are found to be involved in a campaign to disparage opposing counsel.

  • February 13, 2024

    FCC Runs Into Reality Of Limited Power To Fight Deepfakes

    The Federal Communications Commission drew headlines last week when it declared that cloned voices fall under a federal ban on junk calls. But the ruling may not be as powerful as supporters would like, especially as campaign shenanigans heat up as election season draws near.

  • February 13, 2024

    PR Giant Ketchum Sued Over Voyager's Celeb Crypto Promos

    A class of users of bankrupt crypto lender Voyager have sued public relations company Ketchum Inc. in Florida federal court over its work organizing a Voyager event with an NBA basketball team and other promotional materials, which the users say amounted to aiding and abetting the crypto platform's sale of unregistered securities.

  • February 13, 2024

    Ex-Def Jam Exec Sues Russell Simmons Alleging 1990s Rape

    A former executive at Def Jam Recordings accused the label's co-founder, Russell Simmons, in a New York federal lawsuit filed Tuesday of raping her at his Manhattan apartment in the 1990s. 

  • February 13, 2024

    Voyager Investors Suing Mark Cuban Reach Deal With Gronk

    Investors suing billionaire Mark Cuban over his role in promoting now-bankrupt Voyager Digital Ltd. said Tuesday they had reached a tentative agreement with former NFL star Rob Gronkowski to stay claims tied to his social media posts and appearances boosting the cryptocurrency firm.

  • February 13, 2024

    Likee Video App Can't Swipe Away BMG's Copyright Suit

    The company behind Likee must face a trimmed version of BMG's copyright lawsuit alleging the short-video creation app exploits artists' music without permission, a California federal judge ruled, tossing the music publisher's direct infringement claim but keeping alive its claim of contributory infringement.

  • February 13, 2024

    Fla. Casinos Ask Justices To Undo Seminole Gaming Compact

    Two Florida casino operators are asking the Supreme Court to reverse a lower federal court's decision that said a compact allowing online sports betting off tribal lands between the Sunshine State and the Seminole Tribe is lawful, arguing that the outcome of the case could set a nationwide precedent as an end-run around state and federal limitations in the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act.

  • February 13, 2024

    'Rust' Armorer's Phone Snafu Shows Risks Of Texting Clients

    A legal dust-up over compromised text messages between a movie prop weapons expert and her lawyer in the "Rust" film shooting case raises questions about whether attorneys should text with clients and serves as a cautionary tale for prosecutors and the defense on the importance of protecting privileged communications, experts say.

Expert Analysis

  • Why E-Commerce Tools Are Under Fire Amid Privacy Lawsuits

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    As lawsuits try to shoehorn new technologies into decades-old privacy laws never intended for the digital age, e-commerce tools and the companies that use them are increasingly at risk, and retailers should act now to minimize their potential exposure, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Legal Lessons From Past World Cups To Keep In Mind For '26

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    The 2022 World Cup in Qatar and the 2023 Women's World Cup in Australia and New Zealand set new standards for sustainability, human rights and sponsorship — and with those new standards come new challenges for those involved in the planning of the 2026 World Cup in North America, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • A Year-End Look At Florida's Capital Investment Tax Credit

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    Notwithstanding the Walt Disney Co.’s feud with Gov. Ron DeSantis this year, Florida's capital investment tax credit will continue to make the state a favored destination for large corporations, particularly in light of the new federal alternative minimum tax and the Pillar Two top-up tax, says Alan Lederman at Gunster.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • New Legal Frameworks Are Instrumental For AI In Music

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    As artificial intelligence encroaches — or complements — the deeply human art of music making, creating harmony between law and technology will require all stakeholders in the music industry to provide input on intellectual property and ethical concerns, say Ariela Benchlouch and Gai Sher at Greenspoon Marder.

  • IP Suits Over Brand Owner Font Use Offer Cautionary Tales

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    Dyan Finguerra-DuCharme and Mallory Chandler at Pryor Cashman consider the history of fonts and point to recent court decisions that show how brand owners can avoid legal typeface troubles.

  • Employer Lessons After 2023's Successful Labor Strikes

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    Following recent historic strikes in the automotive, entertainment and health care industries, employers of all types can learn key insights about how unions may approach negotiations and strikes going forward, and nonunionized workplaces should anticipate a drive for increased union membership, say Lenny Feigel and Mark Neuberger at Foley & Lardner.

  • What Prince Harry Privacy Case May Mean For Media Ethics

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    An English High Court recently allowed the privacy case brought by Prince Harry and six other claimants against the Daily Mail publisher to proceed, which, if successful, could embolden other high-profile individuals to bring claims and lead to renewed calls for a judicial public inquiry into British press ethics, says Philippa Dempster at Freeths.

  • Copyright Ruling A Victory For Innovation In Publishing Sector

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    The D.C. Circuit’s recent ruling in Valancourt v. Garland shows that demanding book copies without paying for them is arguably property theft, proving that the practice stifles innovation in the publishing industry by disincentivizing small printing companies from entering the market due to a fear of high costs and outdated government regulations, says Zvi Rosen at Southern Illinois University School of Law.

  • 3 Rulings Illustrate Infringement Hurdles For Hip-Hop Plaintiffs

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    Three district court decisions dismissing hip-hop copyright claims recently came down in quick succession, indicating that plaintiffs face significant hurdles when they premise claims on the use of words, phrases and themes that are common in the genre, say Benjamin Halperin and Shiara Robinson at Cowan DeBaets.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Mexico

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    ESG has yet to become part of the DNA of the Mexican business model, but huge strides are being made in that direction, as more stakeholders demand that companies adopt, at the least, a modicum of sustainability commitments and demonstrate how they will meet them, says Carlos Escoto at Galicia Abogados.

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