Ohio

  • February 23, 2024

    Christian Clinic Says Trans Surgery Suit Bolsters Mich. Fears

    A Michigan clinic fighting to show it can challenge a state civil rights law it claims would force it to care for transgender patients told the Sixth Circuit that a suit targeting a Colorado children's hospital that stopped providing surgeries for transgender patients underscores how it could come under fire as well. 

  • February 23, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs DOL's Black Lung Benefits Award For Miner

    The Sixth Circuit stood by an administrative law judge's ruling that a former coal miner is entitled to black lung benefits even if his long history of smoking might have also contributed to his pneumoconiosis, denying a petition for review from the man's former employer.

  • February 22, 2024

    Ex-BP Exec's Husband Cops To $1.7M Insider Trading

    The husband of a former manager at British oil and gas company BP PLC on Thursday pled guilty to securities fraud in Texas federal court and agreed to forfeit the $1.7 million he made with the help of insider trading, the U.S. Department of Justice said Thursday.

  • February 22, 2024

    No Partnership In Hot Dog Eatery Deal, NC Court Rules

    A restaurateur has beaten a lawsuit that alleged he jilted an associate in a deal to buy hot dog eateries, with North Carolina's business court reasoning the two never had a legally binding partnership.

  • February 22, 2024

    Wash. AG Can't Go It Alone Against Kroger Merger, Cos. Say

    Kroger and Albertsons have urged a judge to toss Washington state's "go-it-alone" bid to block their $24.6 billion merger deal, arguing the anti-competitive concerns raised by the state's attorney general are not a nationwide antitrust issue.

  • February 22, 2024

    Chamber, Biz Groups Fight Class Cert. In GM Defect Suit

    Automotive and product manufacturer associations on Wednesday sided with General Motors in seeking to reverse the certification of 26 classes of drivers who allege the automaker sold vehicles with defective transmissions, saying allowing classes to include uninjured drivers would create billions of dollars in unnecessary litigation.

  • February 22, 2024

    FirstEnergy Faces Renewed Consumer Probes Amid Scandal

    The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio has decided to lift its stay on four separate consumer protection investigations into three FirstEnergy Corp. subsidiaries, stemming from corruption surrounding a law paving the way for a $1.3 billion nuclear energy bailout.

  • February 22, 2024

    B. Riley Stands By Franchise Group Deal After Internal Review

    B. Riley Financial reaffirmed its commitment to the $2.6 billion take-private deal for Franchise Group Inc. despite the misconduct of former Franchise Group CEO Brian Kahn, saying on Thursday that its audit committee determined through a nine-week internal review that B. Riley had no knowledge of or involvement in the misconduct.

  • February 21, 2024

    39 AGs Call For Federal Pharmacy Benefit Manager Reform

    The list of critics of pharmacy benefit managers continues to grow as nearly 40 attorneys general have thrown their weight behind a trio of federal bills they say would force more transparency into an "opaque" industry that has "been a cause of rising drug prices."

  • February 21, 2024

    Tribes, Mich., Feds Refute Great Lakes Fishing Challenge

    Several Native American tribes, the state of Michigan and the federal government have urged the Sixth Circuit to reject a sport fishing group's attempt to sink a tribal fishing pact for parts of lakes Huron, Michigan and Superior, arguing it strikes an appropriate balance between respecting tribal fishing rights and protecting the Great Lakes fisheries.

  • February 21, 2024

    Justices Squabble Over Emergency Review Of EPA Smog Plan

    The U.S. Supreme Court's liberal wing denounced during oral argument Wednesday their colleagues' decision to consider the merits of four related emergency requests to prevent the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from implementing a plan to reduce cross-state pollution without first getting lower court input.

  • February 21, 2024

    Irish Pub Chain's Ex-CFO Gets 1.5 Years For $1M Tax Fraud

    The former chief financial officer of a pub chain with more than a dozen Irish-themed restaurants was sentenced to one and a half years in prison Wednesday by an Ohio federal court for his role in a bookkeeping scheme that defrauded eight states of $1 million in sales taxes.

  • February 21, 2024

    'Loser Pays' Arbitration Pact Spurs Age Bias Case's Revival

    An Ohio state appeals court revived a fired orthodontist's age bias suit claiming she was sacked after complaining that a younger colleague harassed her, ruling that a trial court was too quick to kick the case to arbitration in light of the contract's potentially problematic "loser pays" clause.

  • February 21, 2024

    Ohio Justice Fights To Keep Election Label Rule Suit Alive

    Ohio Supreme Court Justice Jennifer Brunner pushed back against the Buckeye State secretary of state's bid to throw out her suit challenging a law requiring candidates for appellate judgeships to have their party affiliations on election ballots, arguing her constitutional rights had already been violated.

  • February 20, 2024

    US Chamber Urges 6th Circ. To Ax FirstEnergy Class Cert.

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, former U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission officials and others have urged the Sixth Circuit to reverse class certification in a case accusing FirstEnergy Corp. of committing securities fraud in connection with a multimillion-dollar bribe made to a convicted politician.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ex-OCC Fintech Chief Won Over Top Brass Despite Red Flags

    The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency's onetime fintech chief who seemingly fabricated his professional background appears to have sailed through the hiring process at the agency, according to internal OCC communications obtained by Law360.

  • February 20, 2024

    FERC Greenlights $6.7B Vistra-Energy Harbor Merger

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has approved a $6.7 billion proposed merger between Vistra Corp. and Ohio-based Energy Harbor LLC after taking extra time to review the tie-up amid competition concerns from both federal antitrust officials and state consumer advocates.

  • February 20, 2024

    GOP Sens. Seek Full Impeachment Trial For Mayorkas

    A group of Senate Republicans made the case on Tuesday that their constitutional duty compels them to hold a full impeachment trial for Alejandro Mayorkas, secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, despite reservations from other Republicans in the Democrat-led Senate.

  • February 20, 2024

    Pa. Contractor Says Ohio Cosmetic Centers Skipped $2M Bill

    A construction contractor took the owner of several medical spa and cosmetic surgery practices to Pennsylvania state court on Friday after the healthcare firm allegedly halted projects in two Ohio suburbs and then failed to pay $2 million that the builder was owed for its work on them.

  • February 16, 2024

    6th Circ. Rejects FirstEnergy Objector's Appeal In $180M Case

    The Sixth Circuit on Friday rejected an appeal from a FirstEnergy investor who was holding up a $180 million settlement in a derivative suit seeking to hold the utility company responsible for its involvement in a $1 billion bribery scandal.

  • February 16, 2024

    The Congressman Who Reps Cannabis Reform On Capitol Hill

    Rep. Earl Blumenauer speaks to Law360 about the prospects for Congress enacting marijuana reform, why he supports moving cannabis to Schedule III and some of the drug policy triumphs and setbacks in his home state of Oregon.

  • February 16, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Deadlines, Delivery Drivers & Smog

    The U.S. Supreme Court will be closed Monday for Presidents Day and will begin a short oral argument week on Tuesday, during which the justices will consider the deadlines for challenging a federal agency's action and bringing copyright infringement claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    News broke last week that Delaware's Court of Chancery will say goodbye to its current longest-serving jurist, a development that quickly overshadowed a busy week of new merger and board disputes, fee rulings, settlements, and books-and-records demands.

  • February 16, 2024

    Ex-Ohio Judge Indefinitely Suspended For Felony Convictions

    The Ohio Supreme Court indefinitely suspended a former judge for the Buckeye State's Marion County Court of Common Pleas Friday, after he was convicted on two felony counts arising from a car crash that occurred while he was still on the bench.

  • February 16, 2024

    Former Worker Says Supercuts Owner Cut OT Rate Too Short

    A former worker is accusing the owner of about 400 Supercuts, Cost Cutters and Holiday Hair salons in seven states of shortchanging its hourly employees on their compensation by not accounting for commissions and other non-discretionary bonuses in their overtime rate calculations.

Expert Analysis

  • 4 Business-Building Strategies For Introvert Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Introverted lawyers can build client bases to rival their extroverted peers’ by adapting time-tested strategies for business development that can work for any personality — such as claiming a niche, networking for maximum impact, drawing on existing contacts and more, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Opinion

    3 Ways Justices' Disclosure Defenses Miss The Ethical Point

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    The rule-bound interpretation of financial disclosures preferred by U.S. Supreme Court Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas — demonstrated in their respective statements defending their failure to disclose gifts from billionaires — show that they do not understand the ethical aspects of the public's concern, says Jim Moliterno at the Washington and Lee University School of Law.

  • Pending 6th Circ. Ruling Has Broad Class Action Implications

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    If the Sixth Circuit decides in FirstEnergy Corp. Securities Litigation to treat alleged half-truths as omissions for the purposes of class certification, public companies would be exposed to near-automatic class certification in nearly every securities case and would face steeper evidentiary hurdles at the merits stages, say attorneys at Willkie.

  • Ohio Rulings Are Cautionary Tales For Attorneys In Crisis

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    Two recent decisions from Ohio state courts provide a sobering reminder that a counsel’s personal emergencies will not always suffice to alter court deadlines or excuse procedural missteps, and that prompt communication and documentation are crucial in the Buckeye State and beyond, says L. Bradfield Hughes at Porter Wright.

  • What Courts' Deference Preference Can Mean For Sentencing

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Vargas decision deepens the split among federal appeals courts on the level of deference afforded to commentary in the U.S. sentencing guidelines — an issue that has major real-life ramifications for defendants, and is likely bound for the U.S. Supreme Court, say Jennifer Freel and Michael Murtha at Jackson Walker.

  • Caregiver Flexibility Is Crucial For Atty Engagement, Retention

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    As the battle for top talent continues post-pandemic, many firms are attempting to attract employees with progressive hybrid working environments — and supporting caregivers before, during and after an extended leave is a critically important way to retain top talent, says Manar Morales at The Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • What To Watch As Justices Take Up Title VII Job Transfer Case

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    With its recent decision to hear Muldrow v. City of St. Louis, the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to decide whether an involuntary job transfer can count as employment discrimination under Title VII — an eventual ruling that has potential to reshape workplace bias claims nationwide, says Adam Grogan at Bell Law Group.

  • Opinion

    3 Principles Should Guide MTC's Digital Products Tax Work

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    As the Multistate Tax Commission's project to harmonize sales tax on digital products moves forward, three key principles will help the commission's work group arrive at unambiguous definitions and help states avoid unintended costs, say Charles Kearns and Jeffrey Friedman at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • In-Office Engagement Is Essential To Associate Development

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    As law firms develop return-to-office policies that allow hybrid work arrangements, they should incorporate the specific types of in-person engagement likely to help associates develop attributes common among successful firm leaders, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Perspectives

    A Judge's Pitch To Revive The Jury Trial

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    Ohio state Judge Pierre Bergeron explains how the decline of the jury trial threatens public confidence in the judiciary and even democracy as a whole, and he offers ideas to restore this sacred right.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

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    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funding Disclosure Should Be Mandatory

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    Despite the Appellate Rules Committee's recent deferral of the issue of requiring third-party litigation funding disclosure, such a mandate is necessary to ensure the even-handed administration of justice across all cases, says David Levitt at Hinshaw.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • Immigration Program Pitfalls Exacerbate Physician Shortages

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    Eliminating shortcomings from U.S. immigration regulations and policies could help mitigate the national shortage of physicians by encouraging foreign physicians to work in medically underserved areas, but progress has been halted by partisan gridlock, say Alison Hitz and Dana Schwarz at Clark Hill.

  • Perspectives

    Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

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    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

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