Ohio

  • February 09, 2024

    Ohio Says Google Search Meets 'Common Carrier' Test

    Ohio enforcers have told a state court the undisputed evidence shows Google's search engine meets all the criteria for a common carrier designation, contending the service is a "public concern" because a large portion of the population relies on it for important needs.

  • February 09, 2024

    Biden Admin. Seeks Suppliers For Major Clean Energy Deals

    The Biden administration is looking for contractors to provide clean electricity to civilian and defense agencies in the mid-Atlantic and Midwest states for what it says will be one of the federal government's "largest-ever clean electricity purchases."

  • February 09, 2024

    Fruit Of The Loom Entity Seeks Pay For Sports Complex Work

    Fruit of the Loom subsidiary Russell Brands LLC said it's owed $256,000 for its work on the construction of an Ohio sports complex, telling an Ohio federal court that the builder, property owner and surety have failed to tender payment nearly a year after the work was completed.

  • February 09, 2024

    6th Circ. Says Fed. Court Can't Hear $420K Tax Lien Case

    Federal law prevents an Ohio company from suing county tax assessors in Ohio federal court over whether the company owes more than $420,000 in back property taxes, a Sixth Circuit panel ruled.

  • February 09, 2024

    Flint Shouldn't Be 'Yardstick' In Water Cases, 6th Circ. Told

    Children accusing a small Michigan city of botching its response to lead contamination in drinking water told the Sixth Circuit on Thursday their case has been unfairly measured against the Flint water crisis.

  • February 09, 2024

    Jordan Calls For Investigation Into DOJ's Deal With IRS Leaker

    House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jim Jordan is investigating whether federal prosecutors were politically motivated to allow the former IRS contractor who leaked former President Donald Trump's tax returns to plead guilty to a single count of illegal disclosure, calling the arrangement "a sweetheart deal."

  • February 09, 2024

    Ford Plant's Meetings Cheat Workers Out Of OT, Court Told

    Process coaches at Ford must attend pre- and post-shift meetings before they clock in and after they clock out, cheating them out of overtime pay, a former worker alleged in a proposed collective action filed in Ohio federal court.

  • February 09, 2024

    Owens Corning To Buy Door-Maker Masonite In $3.9B Deal

    Ohio-based construction materials manufacturer Owens Corning said Friday it has inked a $3.9 billion agreement to buy Tampa, Florida-based door-maker Masonite International Corp., just weeks after the latter company's earlier effort to buy PGT Innovations Inc. fell through.

  • February 08, 2024

    6th Circ. Affirms Most Of Ex-Pitcher's $450K Win In TM Case

    The Sixth Circuit on Thursday upheld most of a nearly $450,000 jury award for an ex-Major League Baseball pitcher in a trademark infringement case, but said $67,649 in punitive damages must be reconsidered under the correct legal standard.

  • February 08, 2024

    Transport Co. Agrees To Settle Workers' Retirement Plan Suit

    Former transportation company employees told an Ohio federal court Thursday they reached a deal with the company to end a class of workers' lawsuit alleging the company followed the poor advice of its investment consultant in replacing most of its retirement plan options with subpar funds.

  • February 08, 2024

    1st Amendment Limited In Court, Prosecutor Tells 6th Circ.

    The First Amendment "is not without limit in a courtroom setting," says a Michigan county prosecutor who is trying to convince the Sixth Circuit not to disturb a ruling that upholds the state's prohibition on recording livestreaming court proceedings.

  • February 08, 2024

    NTSB Accused Of Withholding Derailed Train Parts

    Rail car leasing firm GATX Corp. and chemical firm OxyVinyls LP asked an Ohio federal judge to force the National Transportation Safety Board to let them examine parts from the Norfolk Southern train that derailed in East Palestine last year, claiming the agency is holding out on them.

  • February 08, 2024

    School Board Tells Ohio Justices Tax Appeal Not Time-Barred

    An Ohio law barring third-party challenges to property valuations does not apply retroactively, a school board told the Ohio Supreme Court, urging it to uphold a ruling allowing its challenge to a valuation of an apartment complex to continue.

  • February 08, 2024

    Frost Brown Adds Estate Tax Pro In Cincinnati

    Frost Brown Todd LLP just added a new partner with more than three decades of estate planning experience to its tax, benefits and estates practice group in its Cincinnati office as part of its ongoing investment in its Midwestern presence, the firm has announced.

  • February 08, 2024

    6th Circ. Reverses Trucking Co.'s Win In Retaliation Suit

    The text messages a driver exchanged with a trucking company's owner before being fired aren't clear on what wage and hour aspect the worker was complaining about, the Sixth Circuit ruled, flipping the employer's win in Michigan district court.

  • February 07, 2024

    Goodyear, Michelin Among Tire Cos. Sued Following EU Raids

    Goodyear, Michelin, Bridgestone and a handful of other major tire manufacturers were hit with a proposed class action Wednesday, with consumers accusing them of conspiring to fix the prices of replacement tires just a week after European antitrust authorities said they were conducting unannounced inspections at the companies.

  • February 07, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Rehear Fight Over FERC's Price-Cap Rule

    The Sixth Circuit on Wednesday declined to rehear its December price cap ruling that power supplier groups said is being misconstrued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to argue that the D.C. Circuit's ability to act on related litigation is limited.

  • February 07, 2024

    Wyndham Gets Joint Employer Claim Cut From Trafficking Suit

    An Ohio federal judge has partly granted Wyndham's motion to dismiss an anonymous accuser's claims that the hotel giant's inaction facilitated sex trafficking, reasoning the hotel company didn't exercise enough control over a franchise location's employees to be held liable as a joint employer.

  • February 07, 2024

    Panel Says Ohio Broke Promise In Brewery District Land Fight

    The Ohio appeals court ruled against the Buckeye State's transportation officials in a battle with Columbus business owners over property the state needed for a highway project, finding that the state agency's counsel acknowledged it did not deliver what it promised in a previous settlement.

  • February 07, 2024

    Ohio County Accused Of Extorting New Property Owners

    Montgomery County, Ohio, unlawfully denies water and sewage service to new property owners if the previous owner had an outstanding debt for those services, forcing them to pay off another party's debt through "extortion" and "coercion," according to a new proposed class action filed in federal court.

  • February 06, 2024

    Nissan Can't Make Supplier Pay $25M Award, 6th Circ. Says

    Nissan can't offload onto a brake supplier a $25 million award stemming from a fatal car crash, the Sixth Circuit ruled Tuesday, saying the jury found the braking system "as a whole" to be defective and not just parts supplied to the automaker.

  • February 06, 2024

    Trade Commission Reverses Course, Calls Off Tin Mill Probes

    The U.S. International Trade Commission determined Tuesday that tin mill products from Canada, China and Germany are not harming the domestic industry unfairly, freeing the imports from looming anti-dumping and countervailing duties set by the U.S. Department of Commerce.

  • February 06, 2024

    JPML Consolidates Suboxone Dental Decay Suits In Ohio

    The Northern District of Ohio will host consolidated cases brought against Indivior, Reckitt Benckiser and others alleging the companies failed to warn users of opioid addiction treatment Suboxone that it causes dental decay, according to an order from the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation joining 15 suits.

  • February 06, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs Becton's Win In Royalties Suit

    An inventor of medication valves failed to convince the Sixth Circuit to revive his suit alleging that Becton Dickinson & Co. owes him two years' worth of royalties, with the appellate court reasoning Tuesday that a district court properly interpreted the licensing agreement's payout time limit on his patent.

  • February 06, 2024

    Pies & Pints Manager Seeks Access To Corporate Books

    A minority investor in Ohio pizza and beer chain Pies & Pints filed a second lawsuit Tuesday in Delaware's Court of Chancery, alleging that the restaurant business has failed to respond to his first lawsuit seeking access to the company's books.

Expert Analysis

  • Employer Drug-Testing Policies Must Evolve With State Law

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    As multistate employers face ongoing challenges in drafting consistent marijuana testing policies due to the evolving patchwork of state laws, they should note some emerging patterns among local and state statutes to ensure compliance in different jurisdictions, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Challenging Standing In Antitrust Class Actions: Timing

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    The early resolution of Article III standing disputes in antitrust class actions can result in sizable efficiencies, but some litigants and courts are improperly relying on the Amchem and Ortiz U.S. Supreme Court cases to defer standing issues until after ruling on plaintiffs' class certification motions, say Michael Hamburger and Holly Tao at White & Case.

  • Level Up Lawyers' Business Development With Gamification

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    With employee engagement at a 10-year low in the U.S., there are several gamification techniques marketing and business development teams at law firms can use to make generating new clients and matters more appealing to lawyers, says Heather McCullough at Society 54.

  • Mallory Ruling Leaves Personal Jurisdiction Deeply Unsettled

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    In Mallory v. Norfolk Southern Railway, a closely divided U.S. Supreme Court recently rolled back key aspects of its 2017 opinion in Daimler AG v. Bauman that limited personal jurisdiction, leaving as many questions for businesses as it answers, say John Cerreta and James Rotondo at Day Pitney.

  • 5 Ways Firms Can Rethink Office Design In A Hybrid World

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    As workplaces across the country adapt to flexible work, law firms must prioritize individuality, amenities and technology in office design, says Kristin Cerutti at Nelson Worldwide.

  • C-PACE Laws Offer Boost For Sustainable Development

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    As more emphasis is placed on energy-efficient infrastructure and sustainability projects, state laws establishing property assessed clean energy financing — known as C-PACE in the commercial context — have become increasingly relevant to project developers' capital stacks, say attorneys at Frost Brown.

  • Opinion

    Bar Score Is Best Hiring Metric Post-Affirmative Action

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    After the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling striking down affirmative action admissions policies, law firms looking to foster diversity in hiring should view an applicant's Multistate Bar Examination score as the best metric of legal ability — over law school name or GPA, says attorney Alice Griffin.

  • Piecing Together The Blockchain Evidentiary Hurdles

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    There are common challenges to introducing blockchain evidence at trial and a lack of uniformity in evidentiary codes at the state and federal levels means litigants must carefully navigate the uncertain blockchain puzzle, says Brett Sager at Ehrenstein Sager.

  • Ghosting In BigLaw: How To Come Back From Lack Of Feedback

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    Junior associates can feel powerless when senior colleagues cut off contact instead of providing useful feedback, but young attorneys can get back on track by focusing on practical professional development and reexamining their career priorities, says Rachel Patterson at Orrick.

  • Would Biden Airline Service Order Raise 'Major Questions'?

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    President Joe Biden's recent pledge to require airlines to compensate passengers for delays and cancellations could run afoul of the U.S. Supreme Court's recently expounded "major questions" doctrine — but that will depend on what kind of action the administration takes, and how federal courts choose to apply the doctrine, says Roger Clark at Signature Resolution.

  • Opinion

    States Must Fight Predatory Real Estate Listing Agreements

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    As momentum against long-term real estate listing agreements continues to grow, states should take action to render existing agreements unenforceable and discourage future unfair and deceptive trade practices in real estate, says Elizabeth Blosser at the American Land Title Association.

  • Steps To Success For Senior Associates

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Adriana Paris at Rissman Barrett discusses the increased responsibilities and opportunities that becoming a senior associate brings and what attorneys in this role should prioritize to flourish in this stressful but rewarding next level in their careers.

  • What 6th Circ. Ruling May Portend For PFAS Coverage Cases

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    The Sixth Circuit's recent decision in Admiral Insurance v. Fire-Dex, rejecting the insurer's attempt to avoid coverage, shows that federal courts may decline to resolve novel PFAS state-law issues, and that insurers may have less confidence than originally intimated in the applicability of the pollution exclusion to PFAS claims, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • How To Avoid A Zombie Office Building Apocalypse

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    With national office vacancy rates approaching 20%, policymakers, investors and developers will need to come together in order to prevent this troubling trend from sucking the life out of business districts or contaminating the broader real estate market, say Ryan Sommers and Robyn Minter Smyers at Thompson Hine.

  • Legal Profession Must Do More For Lawyers With Disabilities

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    At the start of Disability Pride month, Rosalyn Richter at Arnold & Porter looks at why lawyers with disabilities are significantly underrepresented in private practice, asserting that law firms and other employers must do more to conquer the implicit bias that deters attorneys from seeking accommodations.

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