Ohio

  • February 20, 2024

    GOP Sens. Seek Full Impeachment Trial For Mayorkas

    A group of Senate Republicans made the case on Tuesday that their constitutional duty compels them to hold a full impeachment trial for Alejandro Mayorkas, secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, despite reservations from other Republicans in the Democrat-led Senate.

  • February 20, 2024

    Pa. Contractor Says Ohio Cosmetic Centers Skipped $2M Bill

    A construction contractor took the owner of several medical spa and cosmetic surgery practices to Pennsylvania state court on Friday after the healthcare firm allegedly halted projects in two Ohio suburbs and then failed to pay $2 million that the builder was owed for its work on them.

  • February 16, 2024

    6th Circ. Rejects FirstEnergy Objector's Appeal In $180M Case

    The Sixth Circuit on Friday rejected an appeal from a FirstEnergy investor who was holding up a $180 million settlement in a derivative suit seeking to hold the utility company responsible for its involvement in a $1 billion bribery scandal.

  • February 16, 2024

    The Congressman Who Reps Cannabis Reform On Capitol Hill

    Rep. Earl Blumenauer speaks to Law360 about the prospects for Congress enacting marijuana reform, why he supports moving cannabis to Schedule III and some of the drug policy triumphs and setbacks in his home state of Oregon.

  • February 16, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Deadlines, Delivery Drivers & Smog

    The U.S. Supreme Court will be closed Monday for Presidents Day and will begin a short oral argument week on Tuesday, during which the justices will consider the deadlines for challenging a federal agency's action and bringing copyright infringement claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    News broke last week that Delaware's Court of Chancery will say goodbye to its current longest-serving jurist, a development that quickly overshadowed a busy week of new merger and board disputes, fee rulings, settlements, and books-and-records demands.

  • February 16, 2024

    Ex-Ohio Judge Indefinitely Suspended For Felony Convictions

    The Ohio Supreme Court indefinitely suspended a former judge for the Buckeye State's Marion County Court of Common Pleas Friday, after he was convicted on two felony counts arising from a car crash that occurred while he was still on the bench.

  • February 16, 2024

    Former Worker Says Supercuts Owner Cut OT Rate Too Short

    A former worker is accusing the owner of about 400 Supercuts, Cost Cutters and Holiday Hair salons in seven states of shortchanging its hourly employees on their compensation by not accounting for commissions and other non-discretionary bonuses in their overtime rate calculations.

  • February 15, 2024

    Sens. Press Zelle To Clarify Fraud Reimbursement Policies

    The chair of the U.S. Senate's banking committee and two of its members on Thursday pressed the CEO of the company behind Zelle to clarify the instant payment platform's policies protecting consumers from scams and fraud.

  • February 15, 2024

    IP Forecast: 'No Labels' Party Feuds With Website Over Name

    In advance of debuting candidates for its promised "Unity Ticket for 2024," third-party political group No Labels will fight next week with a website's owners who say the group's name is merely a generic phrase any candidate can use. Here's a look at that case — plus all the other major intellectual property matters on deck in the coming week.

  • February 15, 2024

    Shoppers Say Albertsons-Kroger Suit Shortcomings Fixed

    Consumers challenging Kroger's $24.6 billion bid for Albertsons defended their revised lawsuit in California federal court against the supermarkets' latest dismissal bid, arguing their tweaked complaint now adequately identifies the affected stores and lays out how the deal threatens competition.

  • February 15, 2024

    HHS Targets Biz Group's Standing In Bid To End Medicare Suit

    The Biden administration has asked an Ohio federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit challenging the Medicare price negotiation program, contending that the local business group serving as lead plaintiff lacks standing to sue.

  • February 15, 2024

    GM Tells 6th Circ. Unharmed Drivers Can't Be Certified

    General Motors urged the Sixth Circuit on Wednesday to reverse the certification of 26 classes of drivers who allege the automaker sold vehicles with defective transmissions, saying the district court "shirked" its duty to rigorously analyze issues before granting the certification.

  • February 15, 2024

    Michigan Wants 1 Panel For 3 Appeals Of LGBTQ Rights Laws

    The Michigan Civil Rights Commission asked the Sixth Circuit to put three separate appeals brought by religious organizations objecting to the state's laws designating gender identity and sexual orientation as protected classes before the same merits panel, arguing that doing so would ensure judicial consistency.

  • February 15, 2024

    What Rescheduling Pot Would Mean For Criminal Justice Reform

    While federal drug enforcers mull a recommendation from health regulators to loosen restrictions on marijuana, criminal justice reformers are warning that rescheduling the drug would not realize President Joe Biden's campaign promise to decriminalize marijuana.

  • February 15, 2024

    Biggest Tiremakers Sued Over Alleged Price-Fixing

    An Illinois tire buyer is piggy-backing off last month's European Commission raids of tire manufacturers in a new class action, alleging that the biggest players in the industry have been colluding to artificially inflate new replacement tire prices in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • February 15, 2024

    Petition Watch: Classes, Litigation Changes & Fraud Theories

    The U.S. Supreme Court receives thousands of petitions for review each term, but only a few make the news. Here, Law360 looks at four petitions filed in the past three weeks that you might've missed, including questions over how courts should analyze class certification bids and regulations restricting specific speech for content-neutral reasons, whether plaintiffs must reestablish standing after amending lawsuits, and what constitutes fraud.

  • February 15, 2024

    8 Men Get Jail Time In $2M Hemp Wine Pump-And-Dump Ploy

    Ohio federal prosecutors have announced the convictions of eight men charged with participating in a pump-and-dump scheme meant to boost the Global Resource Energy Inc. stock price, which purportedly planned to offer hemp-infused wine.

  • February 15, 2024

    Feds Say Tax Prepper Filed Over $1M In False 2020 Returns

    The U.S. Department of Justice's Tax Division took an Ohio tax preparer and his two businesses to federal court alleging he has employed "at least four definable schemes to generate or inflate his customers' refunds" and cost the government $1 million in revenue for the 2020 tax year alone.

  • February 14, 2024

    Ohio Doc. Group Not Named Too Late In Neck Injury Suit

    An Ohio state appeals court has revived a woman's claims against Mid-Ohio Physicians LLP and one of its doctors in a suit alleging she fell out of a hospital bed and sustained injuries, saying the trial court was wrong to find that she'd added them to the suit after the statute of limitations had expired.

  • February 14, 2024

    Colo. Wants To Stop $24B Kroger Merger, 'No Poach' Deal

    Colorado's attorney general on Wednesday sued to block a proposed $24.6 billion merger between Kroger and Albertsons, alleging in a state court complaint that the deal between the state's two largest grocery chains would result in a virtual monopoly in some regions and harm consumers and workers.

  • February 14, 2024

    Ohio Justices Uphold Local Taxes On In-State Teleworkers

    An Ohio law allowing Cincinnati to tax remote workers during the COVID-19 pandemic did not violate the due process rights of a taxpayer who lived and worked outside the city, the Ohio Supreme Court said Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    Hospitality Cos. Seek To Sink Trafficking Survivor's Suit

    Choice Hotels International Inc., Wyndham Hotels & Resorts Inc. and other hotel companies are urging an Ohio federal judge to end a suit from a sex trafficking survivor alleging they allowed crimes against her to continue, with Choice Hotels eyeing dismissal and the other defendants seeking early wins.

  • February 13, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs Drugmakers' Early Win In Diabetes Drug MDL

    The Sixth Circuit on Tuesday affirmed an early victory for AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Bristol Myers Squibb Co. and McKesson Corp. in multidistrict litigation alleging the diabetes drugs they manufacture, Onglyza and Kombiglyze, cause heart failure, holding that a lower court had multiple "good reasons" for finding the plaintiffs' expert's testimony unreliable.

  • February 13, 2024

    Kroger Says Its Past Shows Albertsons Deal Will Drop Prices

    Kroger has shared some statistics that it says show its merger with the country's second-biggest grocery chain, Albertsons, won't be a bad thing, pointing to evidence that prices usually drop at a grocery chain after being acquired by Kroger.

Expert Analysis

  • A Lawyer's Guide To Approaching Digital Assets In Discovery

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    The booming growth of cryptocurrency and non-fungible tokens has made digital assets relevant in many legal disputes but also poses several challenges for discovery, so lawyers must garner an understanding of the technology behind these assets, the way they function, and how they're held, says Brett Sager at Ehrenstein Sager.

  • Opinion

    High Court's Ethics Statement Places Justices Above The Law

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    The U.S. Supreme Court justices' disappointing statement on the court's ethics principles and practices reveals that not only are they satisfied with a status quo in which they are bound by fewer ethics rules than other federal judges, but also that they've twisted the few rules that do apply to them, says David Janovsky at the Project on Government Oversight.

  • Opinion

    Time For Law Schools To Rethink Unsung Role Of Adjuncts

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    As law schools prepare for the fall 2023 semester, administrators should reevaluate the role of the underappreciated, indispensable adjunct, and consider 16 concrete actions to improve the adjuncts' teaching experience, overall happiness and feeling of belonging, say T. Markus Funk at Perkins Coie, Andrew Boutros at Dechert and Eugene Volokh at UCLA.

  • Tips For In-House Legal Leaders In A Challenging Economy

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    Amid today's economic and geopolitical uncertainty, in-house legal teams are running lean and facing increased scrutiny and unique issues, but can step up and find innovative ways to manage outcomes and capitalize on good business opportunities, says Tim Parilla at LinkSquares.

  • Beware Patchwork Of State NIL Laws For Student-Athletes

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    With each U.S. state at a different stage of engaging with name, image and likeness laws for collegiate and high school student-athletes, the NIL world is as much a minefield for attorneys as it is for the players themselves — and counsel must remain on red alert for any and all legislative changes, say Lauren Bernstein and Dan Lust at Moritt Hock.

  • When Are Cos. Liable For Building Customers' Designs?

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    The Sixth Circuit's recent decision in Cash-Darling v. Recycling Equipment serves as a warning to manufacturers regarding the extent to which they may become involved in customers' design decisions without exposing themselves to liability, and highlights the fact-sensitive nature of such cases, says Timothy Freeman at Tanenbaum Keale.

  • What Associates Need To Know Before Switching Law Firms

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    The days of staying at the same firm for the duration of one's career are mostly a thing of the past as lateral moves by lawyers are commonplace, but there are several obstacles that associates should consider before making a move, say attorneys at HWG.

  • A Case For Sharing Mediation Statements With Counterparties

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    In light of a potential growing mediation trend of only submitting statements to the mediator, litigants should think critically about the pros and cons of exchanging statements with opposing parties as it could boost the chances of reaching a settlement, says Arthur Eidelhoch at Eidelhoch Mediation.

  • Preparing For Legal Scrutiny Of Data Retention Policies

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    Two recent cases involving Google and Meta should serve as a call to action for companies to ensure their data retention policies are updated and properly implemented to the degree of being able to withstand judicial scrutiny, especially as more data is generated by emerging technologies, say Jack Kallus and Labeed Choudhry at Kaufman Dolowich.

  • EPA's Good Neighbor Ozone Plan: What Cos. Should Know

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    With the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's recently issued Good Neighbor Rule set to restrict ozone-forming smokestack emissions from power plants and industrial facilities in 23 states, the time is now for companies to consider options available under the rule to mitigate costs and legal exposure, says John Watson at Spencer Fane.

  • Opinion

    Attorneys Should Have An Ethical Duty To Advance DEI

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    National and state bar associations are encouraging attorneys to apply diversity, equity and inclusion practices in the legal profession and beyond, and these associations should take it one step further by formally recognizing ethical duties for attorneys to promote DEI, which could better the legal profession and society, says Elena Mitchell at Moore & Van Allen.

  • Data-Driven Insights Are Key To Attracting Today's Clients

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    As law firm growth slows and competition for clients increases, modern firms must rely on robust data analytics to develop the sector-based expertise and industry insights that clients increasingly prioritize in relationships with counsel, says Lavinia Calvert at Intapp.

  • In Arbitration, Consider The Influence Of State Laws

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    A California appellate court's recent refusal, based in state law, to compel arbitration in Barraza v. Tesla illustrates the importance of understanding substantive and procedural differences between state arbitration law and the Federal Arbitration Act — and when those distinctions can alter case outcomes, says Richard Mason at MasonADR.

  • Ghosting In BigLaw: Why Better Feedback Habits Are Needed

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    Not giving assignments or constructive criticism to junior associates can significantly affect their performance and hours, potentially leading them to leave the firm, but partners can prevent this by asking the right questions and creating a culture of feedback, says Rachel Patterson at Orrick.

  • Rebuttal

    Law Needs A Balance Between Humanism And Formalism

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    A recent Law360 guest article rightly questions the pretextual pseudo-originalism that permits ideology to masquerade as judicial philosophy, but the cure would kill the patient because directness, simplicity and humanness are achievable without renouncing form or sacrificing stare decisis, says Vanessa Kubota at the Arizona Court of Appeals.

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