Ohio

  • February 13, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A pizza chain, an energy company, a medical-device maker and a Manila casino were all hit with book-and-record demands last week in Delaware's Court of Chancery. A shoe company also walked away from a shareholder suit, two cryptocurrency companies tallied the costs of a broken merger, and three cigarette giants argued over Florida settlement payments.

  • February 13, 2024

    Ex-IRS Contractor Appeals 5-Year Sentence For Tax Info Leak

    A former IRS contractor sentenced to five years in prison for stealing and leaking former President Donald Trump's tax returns — and those of thousands of other wealthy people — to the media told a D.C. federal court he will appeal his final judgment.

  • February 13, 2024

    Ky. Alleges Kroger Had 'Outsized' Role In State's Opioid Crisis

    Kentucky Attorney General Russell Coleman accused the Kroger Co. and two subsidiaries of ignoring red flags and suspicious orders as opioids devastated the state, alleging in a new suit the massive grocery and pharmacy chain violated nuisance and consumer protection laws.

  • February 13, 2024

    Insurer Says Fire Co. Owes $3.7M For Hotel Water Damage

    A fire protection and security services company must pay more than $3.7 million for water damage at an Ohio hotel, a Liberty Mutual unit told an Ohio federal court, arguing that the damage was caused by the company's negligence in maintaining a fire sprinkler system.

  • February 12, 2024

    Bribery Is Not Securities Fraud, FirstEnergy Tells 6th Circ.

    FirstEnergy Corp. is asking the Sixth Circuit to overturn class certification in a case accusing the company of committing securities fraud in connection with a multimillion-dollar bribe made to a convicted politician, arguing that "half-truths" about the company's aging power plants cannot be the basis of class-wide claims.

  • February 12, 2024

    Ohio Judge Refuses To End Pause On Social Media Age Law

    An Ohio federal judge has extended a temporary hold on a new state law requiring social media platforms and other sites to get parents' consent before opening accounts for children under 16, issuing a preliminary injunction after finding the law unconstitutional.

  • February 12, 2024

    Bioenergy Cos. Beat Ohio Towns' Ammonia Emissions Suit

    An Ohio federal judge on Monday dismissed a Clean Air Act citizen lawsuit filed by two Ohio communities against a pair of bioenergy companies for allegedly polluting the air with ammonia emissions, reasoning the state Environmental Protection Agency already sued the companies.

  • February 12, 2024

    Cintas To Pay $4M To End 401(k) Mismanagement Suit

    Uniform supplier Cintas Corp. will pay $4 million to resolve a proposed class action alleging it mismanaged its $1 billion retirement plan that held assets for more than 50,000 people by retaining investment options that cost more and performed worse than others in the market.

  • February 12, 2024

    Like 'Fiction': 3 Netted In FirstEnergy Plant Bailout Scandal

    Two former FirstEnergy Corp. executives and the onetime chair of Ohio's utility regulator allegedly stole money from the company as they helped carry out the massive bribery scheme behind a controversial $1.3 billion bailout for two nuclear energy plants, according to an indictment one prosecutor on Monday said read like fiction.

  • February 09, 2024

    Ohio Says Google Search Meets 'Common Carrier' Test

    Ohio enforcers have told a state court the undisputed evidence shows Google's search engine meets all the criteria for a common carrier designation, contending the service is a "public concern" because a large portion of the population relies on it for important needs.

  • February 09, 2024

    Biden Admin. Seeks Suppliers For Major Clean Energy Deals

    The Biden administration is looking for contractors to provide clean electricity to civilian and defense agencies in the mid-Atlantic and Midwest states for what it says will be one of the federal government's "largest-ever clean electricity purchases."

  • February 09, 2024

    Fruit Of The Loom Entity Seeks Pay For Sports Complex Work

    Fruit of the Loom subsidiary Russell Brands LLC said it's owed $256,000 for its work on the construction of an Ohio sports complex, telling an Ohio federal court that the builder, property owner and surety have failed to tender payment nearly a year after the work was completed.

  • February 09, 2024

    6th Circ. Says Fed. Court Can't Hear $420K Tax Lien Case

    Federal law prevents an Ohio company from suing county tax assessors in Ohio federal court over whether the company owes more than $420,000 in back property taxes, a Sixth Circuit panel ruled.

  • February 09, 2024

    Flint Shouldn't Be 'Yardstick' In Water Cases, 6th Circ. Told

    Children accusing a small Michigan city of botching its response to lead contamination in drinking water told the Sixth Circuit on Thursday their case has been unfairly measured against the Flint water crisis.

  • February 09, 2024

    Jordan Calls For Investigation Into DOJ's Deal With IRS Leaker

    House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jim Jordan is investigating whether federal prosecutors were politically motivated to allow the former IRS contractor who leaked former President Donald Trump's tax returns to plead guilty to a single count of illegal disclosure, calling the arrangement "a sweetheart deal."

  • February 09, 2024

    Ford Plant's Meetings Cheat Workers Out Of OT, Court Told

    Process coaches at Ford must attend pre- and post-shift meetings before they clock in and after they clock out, cheating them out of overtime pay, a former worker alleged in a proposed collective action filed in Ohio federal court.

  • February 09, 2024

    Owens Corning To Buy Door-Maker Masonite In $3.9B Deal

    Ohio-based construction materials manufacturer Owens Corning said Friday it has inked a $3.9 billion agreement to buy Tampa, Florida-based door-maker Masonite International Corp., just weeks after the latter company's earlier effort to buy PGT Innovations Inc. fell through.

  • February 08, 2024

    6th Circ. Affirms Most Of Ex-Pitcher's $450K Win In TM Case

    The Sixth Circuit on Thursday upheld most of a nearly $450,000 jury award for an ex-Major League Baseball pitcher in a trademark infringement case, but said $67,649 in punitive damages must be reconsidered under the correct legal standard.

  • February 08, 2024

    Transport Co. Agrees To Settle Workers' Retirement Plan Suit

    Former transportation company employees told an Ohio federal court Thursday they reached a deal with the company to end a class of workers' lawsuit alleging the company followed the poor advice of its investment consultant in replacing most of its retirement plan options with subpar funds.

  • February 08, 2024

    1st Amendment Limited In Court, Prosecutor Tells 6th Circ.

    The First Amendment "is not without limit in a courtroom setting," says a Michigan county prosecutor who is trying to convince the Sixth Circuit not to disturb a ruling that upholds the state's prohibition on recording livestreaming court proceedings.

  • February 08, 2024

    NTSB Accused Of Withholding Derailed Train Parts

    Rail car leasing firm GATX Corp. and chemical firm OxyVinyls LP asked an Ohio federal judge to force the National Transportation Safety Board to let them examine parts from the Norfolk Southern train that derailed in East Palestine last year, claiming the agency is holding out on them.

  • February 08, 2024

    School Board Tells Ohio Justices Tax Appeal Not Time-Barred

    An Ohio law barring third-party challenges to property valuations does not apply retroactively, a school board told the Ohio Supreme Court, urging it to uphold a ruling allowing its challenge to a valuation of an apartment complex to continue.

  • February 08, 2024

    Frost Brown Adds Estate Tax Pro In Cincinnati

    Frost Brown Todd LLP just added a new partner with more than three decades of estate planning experience to its tax, benefits and estates practice group in its Cincinnati office as part of its ongoing investment in its Midwestern presence, the firm has announced.

  • February 08, 2024

    6th Circ. Reverses Trucking Co.'s Win In Retaliation Suit

    The text messages a driver exchanged with a trucking company's owner before being fired aren't clear on what wage and hour aspect the worker was complaining about, the Sixth Circuit ruled, flipping the employer's win in Michigan district court.

  • February 07, 2024

    Goodyear, Michelin Among Tire Cos. Sued Following EU Raids

    Goodyear, Michelin, Bridgestone and a handful of other major tire manufacturers were hit with a proposed class action Wednesday, with consumers accusing them of conspiring to fix the prices of replacement tires just a week after European antitrust authorities said they were conducting unannounced inspections at the companies.

Expert Analysis

  • Short Message Data Challenges In E-Discovery

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    As short message platforms increasingly dominate work environments, lawyers face multiple programs, different communication styles and emoji in e-discovery, so they must consider new strategies to adapt their processes, says Cristin Traylor at Relativity.

  • Opinion

    Thomas Report Is Final Straw — High Court Needs Ethics Code

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    As a recent report on Justice Clarence Thomas' ongoing conflicts of interest makes evident, Supreme Court justices should be subject to an enforceable and binding code of ethics — like all other federal judges — to maintain the credibility of the institution, says Erica Salmon Byrne at Ethisphere.

  • Joint Representation Ethics Lessons From Ga. Electors Case

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    The Fulton County district attorney's recent motion to disqualify an attorney from representing her elector clients, claiming a nonconsentable conflict of interest, raises key questions about representing multiple clients related to the same conduct and highlights potential pitfalls, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Grace Wynn at HWG.

  • Lawyer Discernment Is Critical In The World Of AI

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    In light of growing practical concerns about risks and challenges posed by artificial intelligence, lawyers' experience with the skill of discernment will position them to help address new ethical and moral dilemmas and ensure that AI is developed and deployed in a way that benefits society as a whole, says Jennifer Gibbs at Zelle.

  • Opinion

    It's Time For Lawyers To Stand Up For Climate Justice

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    The anniversary this week of the Deepwater Horizon disaster offers an opportunity for attorneys to embrace the practice of just transition lawyering — leveraging our skills to support communities on the front lines of climate change and environmental catastrophe as they pursue rebuilding and transformation, says Amy Laura Cahn at Taproot Earth.

  • Don't Forget Alumni Engagement When Merging Law Firms

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    Neglecting law firm alumni programs after a merger can sever the deep connections attorneys have with their former firms, but by combining good data management and creating new opportunities to reconnect, firms can make every member in their expanded network of colleagues feel valued, say Clare Roath and Erin Warner at Troutman Pepper.

  • Without Stronger Due Diligence, Attys Risk AML Regulation

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    Amid increasing pressure to mitigate money laundering and terrorism financing risks in gatekeeper professions, the legal industry will need to clarify and strengthen existing client due diligence measures — or risk the federal regulation attorneys have long sought to avoid, says Jeremy Glicksman at the Nassau County District Attorney’s Office.

  • The Legal Consequences Of High PFAS Background Levels

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    As federal and state regulations around per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances proliferate, emerging scientific literature is showing that PFAS exist in many environments at background levels that exceed regulatory limits — and the potential legal implications are profound, say Grant Gilezan and Paul Stewart at Dykema and Dylan Eberle at Geosyntec Consultants.

  • Every Lawyer Can Act To Prevent Peer Suicide

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    Members of the legal industry can help prevent suicide among their colleagues, and better protect their own mental health, by learning the predictors and symptoms of depression among attorneys and knowing when and how to get practical aid to peers in crisis, says Joan Bibelhausen at Minnesota Lawyers Concerned for Lawyers.

  • Building On Successful Judicial Assignment Reform In Texas

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    Prompt action by the Judicial Conference could curtail judge shopping and improve the efficiency and procedural fairness of the federal courts by implementing random districtwide assignment of cases, which has recently proven successful in Texas patent litigation, says Dabney Carr at Troutman Pepper.

  • Cities Should Explore Minn. Municipal Alcohol Store Model

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    Minnesota’s unique alcohol control model that functions at the municipal level may be worth exploring for cash-strapped cities looking for an additional stream of revenue, though there may be community pushback, say Louis Terminello and Bradley Berkman at Greenspoon Marder.

  • Do Videoconferences Establish Jurisdiction With Defendants?

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    What it means to have minimum contacts in a foreign jurisdiction is changing as people become more accustomed to meeting via video, and defendants’ participation in videoconferencing may be used as a sword or a shield in courts’ personal jurisdiction analysis, says Patrick Hickey at Moye White.

  • Opinion

    Humanism Should Replace Formalism In The Courts

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    The worrying tendency for judges to say "it's just the law talking, not me" in American decision writing has coincided with an historic decline in respect for the courts, but this trend can be reversed if courts develop understandable legal standards and justify them in human terms, says Connecticut Superior Court Judge Thomas Moukawsher.

  • 20 Years On, Campbell Holds Lessons On Reining In Ratios

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    Twenty years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in State Farm v. Campbell provided critical guidance on the constitutionally permissible ratio of punitive to compensatory damages — and both Campbell and subsequent federal circuit court decisions informed by it offer important pointers for defendants, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Don't Let Client Demands Erode Law Firm Autonomy

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    As clients increasingly impose requirements for attorney hiring and retention related to diversity and secondment, law firms must remember their ethical duties, as well as broader issues of lawyer development, culture and firm integrity, to maintain their independence while meaningfully responding to social changes, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

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