Ohio

  • January 24, 2024

    Ohio Senate Greenlights Ban On Youth Gender-Affirming Care

    The Ohio Senate on Wednesday voted to override Gov. Mike DeWine's veto of a bill that would restrict gender-affirming care for transgender youths and ban transgender girls from participating in female sports. 

  • January 24, 2024

    Ohio GOP Lawmakers Float Axing Income, Receipts Taxes

    A group of Republican lawmakers in Ohio filed legislation to phase out the state's personal income tax and gross receipts tax on businesses, saying they are aiming to start the $13 billion tax cut plan in next year's biennial budget.

  • January 24, 2024

    Tort Report: Helicopter Crash Settlement Sets US Record

    A key medical malpractice ruling issued by Ohio's top court and a record-setting helicopter crash settlement lead Law360's Tort Report, which compiles recent personal injury and medical malpractice news that may have flown under the radar.

  • January 23, 2024

    6th Circ. Rejects PREP Act Immunity For Doc In Med Mal Suit

    A doctor and medical provider can't ditch a woman's suit over an abdominal bleed that necessitated emergency surgery on the basis of immunity under the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act, a Sixth Circuit appellate panel has found, saying the suit doesn't back their claim that they treated the patient due to a COVID-19 vaccine side effect.

  • January 23, 2024

    Sherwin-Williams Loses Bid To Block NJ's Pollution Claims

    A New Jersey state court judge denied Sherwin-Williams Co.'s move to block state regulators from arguing or presenting evidence that the paint maker's former plant in Camden County damaged natural water and soil resources.

  • January 23, 2024

    6th Circ. Says Whistleblower Really Fired For 'Coup' Attempt

    A Sixth Circuit panel found Monday that a medical device company fired its president's son not because he ratted out his stepmother to the IRS, but because he tried to seize control of the family heating pad business.

  • January 23, 2024

    Progressive Customers Fire Back At Proposed Dismissal

    Progressive customers in a consolidated proposed class action surrounding the exposure of nearly 350,000 users' personal data to unauthorized actors urged an Ohio federal judge to reject the insurer's dismissal bid, arguing in part that the motion couldn't get around Progressive's own admission to the leak of information.

  • January 23, 2024

    New Frost Brown Office Head Aims To Be 'Champion' In Ohio

    Frost Brown Todd LLP has named a government services, business litigation and appellate practice groups partner with deep roots in the community as its new leader in West Chester, Ohio, the firm said Tuesday.

  • January 23, 2024

    Dinsmore Adds 5-Atty Cybersecurity Team In Cleveland

    Dinsmore & Shohl LLP has added a five-attorney cybersecurity and data privacy team in Cleveland to keep up with the escalating demands of national business clients, the firm said Tuesday.

  • January 23, 2024

    DOJ Digging Into $8B Six Flags-Cedar Fair Merger

    Six Flags and Ohio-based amusement park peer Cedar Fair revealed in regulatory filings Tuesday that the U.S. Department of Justice is looking more closely into their planned $8 billion merger, with the DOJ sending a second request for information as part of its review.

  • January 23, 2024

    Fifth Third Customers Drop Overdraft Class Action Claims

    Two checking account holders voluntarily dropped their proposed class action accusing Fifth Third Bank NA of charging unnecessary overdraft fees as a way of getting tens of millions of dollars for free in violation of the Electronic Fund Transfer Act.

  • January 22, 2024

    Motley Rice Fights DQ Bid In Opioid MDL

    Law firms representing governments suing over the opioid epidemic on Monday told an Ohio federal judge that "corporate wrongdoers" don't get to pick who sues them, in response to a pharmacy benefit manager's bid to disqualify Motley Rice LLC over its representation of other governments in prescription drug disputes.

  • January 22, 2024

    Smucker's, Insurer Want $8M For Fire Smoldering Nut Sparked

    Smucker's and its insurer are seeking to recoup $8 million for fire damages at a peanut butter factory, saying a refrigerator repair technician's mistake led to an evacuation that left no personnel there to extinguish the fire, according to a suit removed Friday to Kentucky federal court.

  • January 22, 2024

    Feds, States To Split Argument Time For EPA Smog Plan

    The U.S. Supreme Court agreed on Monday to split the argument time in four related cases challenging whether the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency can implement a plan to reduce cross-state pollution, giving the U.S. solicitor general's office 20 minutes to argue on behalf of the EPA.

  • January 19, 2024

    Law360 Names Firms Of The Year

    Eight law firms have earned spots as Law360's Firms of the Year, with 55 Practice Group of the Year awards among them, steering some of the largest deals of 2023 and securing high-profile litigation wins, including at the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • January 19, 2024

    Law360 Names Practice Groups Of The Year

    Law360 would like to congratulate the winners of its Practice Groups of the Year awards for 2023, which honor the attorney teams behind litigation wins and major deals that resonated throughout the legal industry this past year.

  • January 19, 2024

    Ohio Court Blesses Atty's 'Zealous' Strategy, Axes Sanctions

    A split Ohio state appeals court on Friday threw out a lower court's sanctions against a lawyer who filed multiple medical malpractice suits without supporting affidavits, finding no evidence the claims lacked merit and endorsing the lawyer's strategy to buy more time.

  • January 19, 2024

    Panel Backs Mich. In Utility's Power Cost Clawback Bid

    A Michigan state appeals court stood by a Wolverine State utility commission's decision that an American Electric Power subsidiary cannot get reimbursed for more than a million dollars it overpaid to supply energy to consumers, stating that the overpayment is a type of cost the company's shareholders should shoulder.

  • January 19, 2024

    Cleaning Co. Eyes Deal In Firing Suit Coverage Bid

    A kitchen exhaust system cleaning company, two Hartford units and an insurance agency are considering mediation to resolve the company's suit seeking $250,000 in damages over the insurer's denial of coverage for an underlying judgment entered against it in a wrongful termination lawsuit, according to a Friday court order.

  • January 19, 2024

    Army Corps Escapes Ohio River Tugboat Service Suit

    An Ohio federal judge has let the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers out of a construction and asphalt company's suit over an allegedly unauthorized tugboat service on the Ohio River, writing in his opinion that the Corps is not properly a defendant just for owning the land the service is using.

  • January 18, 2024

    DOJ, 3 States Join Antitrust Suit Over NCAA's Transfer Rule

    The NCAA faces a growing list of opponents after the U.S. Department of Justice, multiple states and D.C. on Thursday joined seven other states challenging the group's rule that prevents some athletes from competing when they transfer colleges.

  • January 18, 2024

    Green Group Backs Mich. In Pipeline Challenge Venue Spat

    An environmental policy and law center is backing the Michigan attorney general in her appeal of Enbridge Energy's removal to federal court of a state lawsuit seeking to shut down a pipeline that crosses through the state's water, saying it undermines the role of states to protect their interest in natural resources.

  • January 18, 2024

    No 6th Circ. Redo For PFAS Class Targeting 3M, Others

    The Sixth Circuit will not rethink a panel's decision to vacate class certification for 11 million Ohio residents accusing 3M Co. and others of irresponsibly selling products with "forever chemicals" that put people's health at risk, according to a Thursday order stating no judge called for a rehearing vote.

  • January 18, 2024

    Mich. Docs Back Sierra Club's Detroit Smog Lawsuit

    Michigan health professionals have joined the Sierra Club in contesting a federal agency's determination that southeast Michigan's air pollution is under control, arguing in a friend-of-the-court brief this week that the decision will exacerbate already-poor respiratory health in residents of the Detroit area.  

  • January 17, 2024

    'Chaos' Warning Resonates As Justices Mull Chevron's Fate

    A conservative-led campaign against the 40-year-old doctrine of judicial deference to federal regulators appeared vulnerable at U.S. Supreme Court arguments Wednesday to predictions of a litigation tsunami, as justices fretted about an onslaught of suits and politicization of the federal judiciary.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Needs Defense Amid Political Threats

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    Amid recent and historic challenges to the judiciary from political forces, safeguarding judicial independence and maintaining the integrity of the legal system is increasingly urgent, says Robert Peck at the Center for Constitutional Litigation.

  • How Law Firms Can Use Account-Based Marketing Strategies

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    Amid several evolving legal industry trends, account-based marketing can help law firms uncover additional revenue-generating opportunities with existing clients, with key considerations ranging from data analytics to relationship building, say Jennifer Ramsey at stage LLC and consultant Gina Sponzilli.

  • Strategic Succession Planning At Law Firms Is Crucial

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    Senior partners' reluctance to retire, the rise of the nonequity partner tier and generational differences in expectations are all contributing to an increasing number of departures from BigLaw, making it imperative for firms to encourage retirement among senior ranks and provide clearer leadership pathways to junior attorneys, says Laura Leopard at Leopard Solutions.

  • 2nd Circ. OT Ruling Guides On Pay For Off-The-Clock Work

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    While the Second Circuit’s recent holding in Perry v. City of New York reiterated that the Fair Labor Standards Act obligates employers to pay overtime for off-the-clock work, it recognized circumstances, such as an employee’s failure to report, that allow an employer to disclaim the knowledge element that triggers this obligation, say Robert Whitman and Kyle Winnick at Seyfarth.

  • Autonomous Vehicles Must Navigate Patchwork Of State Regs

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    With only modest action by the federal government on the autonomous vehicle regulatory front in 2023, states and localities remain the predominant source of new regulations affecting AVs — but the result is a mix of rules that both help and hinder AV development and adoption, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • Maximizing Law Firm Profitability In Uncertain Times

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    As threats of an economic downturn loom, firms can boost profits by embracing the power of bottom-line management and creating an ecosystem where strategic financial oversight and robust timekeeping practices meet evolved client relations, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Strategic Consulting.

  • Federal Policies Keeping Autonomous Vehicles In Slow Lane

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    In the first installment of this two-part article, attorneys at Faegre Drinker examine recent federal regulations and programs related to autonomous vehicles — and how the federal government's failure to implement a more comprehensive AV regulatory scheme may be slowing the progress of the industry.

  • The Case For Culture Assessments In Sports Programs

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    As hazing allegations against collegiate sports teams and subsequent lawsuits become more prevalent, culture assessments can be implemented as a critical tool to mitigate risks including hazing, lack of gender equity and racism in athletic programs, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Reminds Attys That CBP Can Search Devices

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent Malik v. Department of Homeland Security decision adds to the chorus of federal courts holding that border agents don’t need a warrant to search travelers’ electronic devices, so attorneys should consider certain special precautions to secure privileged information when reentering the U.S., says Jennifer Freel at Jackson Walker.

  • Avoiding The Ethical Pitfalls Of Crowdfunded Legal Fees

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    The crowdfunding of legal fees has become increasingly common, providing a new way for people to afford legal services, but attorneys who accept crowdsourced funds must remember several key ethical obligations to mitigate their risks, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • What Large Language Models Mean For Document Review

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    Courts often subject parties using technology assisted review to greater scrutiny than parties conducting linear, manual document review, so parties using large language models for document review should expect even more attention, along with a corresponding need for quality control and validation, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Series

    Participating In Living History Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My role as a baron in a living history group, and my work as volunteer corporate counsel for a book series fan association, has provided me several opportunities to practice in unexpected areas of law — opening doors to experiences that have nurtured invaluable personal and professional skills, says Matthew Parker at the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.

  • How Attys Can Weather The Next Disaster Litigation Crisis

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    On the heels of a number of damage catastrophes and ensuing litigation this summer alone, attorneys must recognize that it’s a matter of when, not if, the next disaster — whether natural or artificial — will strike, and formulate plans to minimize risks, including consolidating significant claims and taking remedial measures, says Mark Goldberg at Cosmich Simmons.

  • Opinion

    Private Equity Owners Can Remedy Law Firms' Agency Issues

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    Nonlawyer, private-equity ownership of law firms can benefit shareholders and others vulnerable to governance issues such as disparate interests, and can in turn help resolve agency problems, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • How To Protect Atty-Client Privilege While Using Generative AI

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    When using generative artificial intelligence tools, attorneys should consider several safeguards to avoid breaches or complications in attorney-client privilege, say Antonious Sadek and Christopher Campbell at DLA Piper.

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