Personal Injury & Medical Malpractice

  • April 03, 2024

    Judge's Recusal Not Needed In Indiana Hospital Fall Suit

    An Indiana appeals panel rejected a woman's bid to revive her suit over a trip and fall injury she suffered while taking her grandson to a hospital in Hobart, saying the fact the judge's son worked for the hospital's law firm does not show there was a conflict requiring the judge's recusal.

  • April 03, 2024

    Houston Firm Ditches Proposed Data Breach Class Action

    A Texas federal judge threw out a proposed class action accusing Fleming Nolen & Jez LLP of waiting a month to disclose a cyberattack that exposed more than 100 clients' protected health information, citing the lead plaintiff's admission that she didn't even know if any of her data was compromised.

  • April 02, 2024

    Amazon Driver Took, Shared Pics of Actor's Home, Suit Says

    Actor Deon Cole sued Amazon in California state court alleging that one of its delivery drivers took photos of the inside of his home and shared them in a group chat while dropping off groceries, saying Amazon negligently and recklessly hired the driver.

  • April 02, 2024

    Northwestern Must Face Fired Football Coach's $130M Suit

    An Illinois state judge refused Tuesday to dismiss fired Northwestern University football coach Pat Fitzgerald's $130 million contract breach suit alleging he was terminated without cause amid a monthslong probe into hazing allegations, teeing up the case for trial in April 2025.

  • April 02, 2024

    Uber Seeks Exit From Texas Riders' Claims In Assault MDL

    Uber urged a California federal court Monday to toss Texas plaintiffs' claims in the multidistrict litigation seeking to hold the ride-hailing company liable for drivers' sexual assault, saying it can't be held responsible for the actions of individual drivers under Texas law.

  • April 02, 2024

    DC Judge Grapples With Malice Claim In Nunes' WaPo Suit

    A D.C. federal judge on Tuesday questioned whether former California Rep. Devin Nunes had shown The Washington Post acted with actual malice in publishing a 2020 article that discussed the congressman, as the judge weighed the newspaper's bid for summary judgment in defamation litigation brought by Nunes.

  • April 02, 2024

    Alaska Judge Tosses Opioid Nuisance Case Against Pharmacies

    Retail pharmacies including Walgreens Co. and Walmart Inc. have escaped a suit brought by Alaska in state court over their role in the opioid epidemic after a judge found the state's public nuisance claims were a "bridge too far."

  • April 02, 2024

    Connecticut Estate Withdraws Deadly Airbnb Blast Claims

    The estate of a woman who died two years ago after the stove in an Airbnb property in Jamaica erupted into a fiery blast has withdrawn a Connecticut lawsuit against both the online service and the Texas-based owner of the retreat, with the maneuver coming just days after the owner challenged jurisdiction in the state.

  • April 02, 2024

    Reject Carole Baskin's Defamation Appeal, Fla. Justices Told

    The former assistant of Carole Baskin's missing husband urged the Florida Supreme Court not to take up the appeal of a decision reviving her defamation claims against the "Tiger King" star, saying Baskin misrepresented the ruling in her request to the high court to hear the case.

  • April 02, 2024

    Chubb Asks Panel To Revive Archdiocese Abuse Coverage Suit

    Counsel for Chubb urged a New York state appeals court at a hearing Tuesday to undo a trial court decision finding it owed insurance coverage to the Archdiocese of New York for myriad childhood sexual abuse claims against the church.

  • April 02, 2024

    Utility Cos. Must Face Uri MDL Gross Negligence Claims

    Transmission and distribution utility providers can't escape allegations they were grossly negligent in cutting off power to Texans during winter storm Uri, a Texas state appeals court ruled Tuesday in an opinion that keeps intact only two claims against the companies in the multidistrict litigation created to handle consumer actions from the severe weather event.

  • April 02, 2024

    Ex-Army Officer Says Gov't Smeared Him With False Claims

    A former major general in the U.S. Army on Tuesday sued the U.S. Department of Defense and others, alleging that the government wrongly recorded him as having assaulted his partner, despite her recanting the allegations and admitting they were a ploy to seek attention.

  • April 02, 2024

    2 Firms Seek To Lead Boeing 737 Max Safety Investor Suit

    Labaton Keller Sucharow LLP and Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP have each asked a Virginia federal judge for a lead role in a securities lawsuit against Boeing over the safety of its 737 Max jets and the role Boeing's top brass allegedly played in diminishing shareholder value.

  • April 02, 2024

    7th Circ. Won't Revive Parents' Claims in Abbott Formula Row

    The Seventh Circuit upheld on Tuesday the dismissal of parents' claims they were economically harmed from buying infant formula that could have been contaminated with bacteria at an Abbott Laboratories plant, saying their alleged injuries aren't enough to prove standing. 

  • April 02, 2024

    Rental Co. Sues Family Of Child Who Drowned On Property

    A North Carolina beach vacation rental company, facing a negligence lawsuit brought by a father whose son died in one of its pools, has in turn filed suit against the deceased child's extended family members, claiming that any blame for the death should be on their shoulders.

  • April 02, 2024

    CSX Denies Liability In Backroads Bridge Crash Suit

    Freight railway giant CSX on Monday denied wrongdoing and insisted it can't be held liable for the injuries of two women who blamed the company's shoddy upkeep of a backroads bridge for a 2022 car crash.

  • April 02, 2024

    Kids' Clothier Didn't Deceive By Silence On PFAS, Judge Says

    An Illinois federal judge has thrown out a proposed class suit alleging that The Children's Place Inc. hid the presence of so-called "forever chemicals" in its school uniforms, saying the plaintiffs haven't alleged any duty to disclose or that the company's statements were misleading.

  • April 02, 2024

    Arizona Cardinals Must Pay $3M For Defaming Former Exec

    The Arizona Cardinals have been ordered to pay nearly $3 million for defaming a former vice president while dismissing him from the team, with a league-appointed arbitrator faulting the team for falsely suggesting the executive committed domestic violence.

  • April 02, 2024

    Cole Scott Beats DQ Bid Over Partner's Past Work

    The plaintiff in a car wreck injury lawsuit cannot disqualify Cole Scott & Kissane PA defense counsel from the case, a Florida federal judge has determined, finding that a firm partner's previous representation of the plaintiff in a separate suit was not enough of a connection to warrant the firm's removal.

  • April 02, 2024

    Sacramento Diocese's $500M Abuse Liability Prompts Ch. 11

    The Roman Catholic Bishop of Sacramento has filed for Chapter 11 in California court to address historical childhood sexual abuse liability that could reach as high as $500 million, saying the hundreds of claims could sap all the debtor's assets unless it sought the protection of bankruptcy.

  • April 01, 2024

    Apple, Other Cos. Say They're No 'Answer' To Astroworld MDL

    Apple Inc., rapper Drake, and nearly a dozen entities behind the 2021 Astroworld festival urged a Houston judge Monday to free them from the mass of litigation stemming from the 50,000-person crowd crush with only about a month to go before the first case will be heard by a jury.

  • April 01, 2024

    Transgender Woman's Healthcare Bias Case Teed Up For Trial

    A Georgia federal judge has said a behavioral health facility cannot escape claims brought against it by a transgender woman who alleges she was mocked and denied critical treatment during a stay there in 2019, teeing up the case to head to a jury trial.

  • April 01, 2024

    6th Circ. Judge Warns Of 'Trap' In Medical Malpractice Laws

    The Sixth Circuit has backed an Ohio federal judge's decision to toss a couple's claim against a doctor they say failed to provide proper prenatal care that could have prevented their child's brain damage, with one judge writing separately that the relevant laws can easily "trap unwary litigants" with their requirements.

  • April 01, 2024

    Ga., FTC Seek $17M+ Fine And Ban On Doc's Stem Cell Ads

    After securing an early win last week against a Georgia doctor and a series of companies that marketed stem cell therapy as a cure-all miracle treatment, federal regulators and the state of Georgia asked a federal judge Monday for $17.7 million in fines and an injunction barring the defendants from any future endeavors in the medical marketing industry.

  • April 01, 2024

    3M Gets Final OK On PFAS Deal Worth Up To $12.5B

    A South Carolina federal judge on Friday gave a final nod on a settlement between 3M and about 12,000 public water systems worth up to $12.5 billion to end claims over so-called forever chemicals in firefighting foam, saying that otherwise it would take years to try the cases.

Expert Analysis

  • Aviation Watch: Pilots Face Mental Health Catch-22

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    The recent case of an Alaska Airlines pilot who attempted to crash an airliner in flight highlights the dilemma facing federally licensed cockpit personnel who need psychological help, yet could lose their jobs if they seek it — but a long-running program may provide a solution, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • How Purdue High Court Case Will Shape Ch. 11 Mass Injury

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent arguments in Harrington v. Purdue Pharma, addressing the authority of bankruptcy courts to approve nonconsensual third-party releases in Chapter 11 settlement plans, highlight the case's wide-ranging implications for how mass injury cases get resolved in bankruptcy proceedings, says George Singer at Holland & Hart.

  • How New Expert Rules Are Already Changing Court Decisions

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    Though not formally effective until last week, some courts have been relying for several years on amended federal rules clarifying judges’ gatekeeping role, so counsel should be prepared to justify their expert witnesses’ methodologies and expect additional motion practice on expert testimony admissibility, say Colleen Kenney and Daniel Kelly at Sidley.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Pa. Court's Venue Ruling Is Likely To Worsen Forum Shopping

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    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court’s recent Hangey v. Husqvarna decision claims to narrowly clarify the standard for evaluating whether a venue is proper, but has broader implications that are likely to exacerbate the forum-shopping problem that already plagues corporate defendants in Pennsylvania, says Stefanie Pitcavage Mekilo and Joseph Schaeffer at Babst Calland.

  • 2nd Circ. Defamation Ruling May Chill NY Title IX Reports

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision, holding accusers in Connecticut Title IX sexual misconduct cases are not immune to defamation claims, means that New York higher education institutions should reassess whether their disciplinary hearing procedures both protect due process and encourage victim and witness participation, says Nicole Donatich at Cullen and Dykman.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • How Color Psychology Can Help Tell Your Trial Narrative

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    Research shows that color is a powerful sensory input that affects memory and perception, so attorneys should understand how, when and why to use certain shades in trial graphics to enhance their narrative and draw jurors’ focus, says Adam Bloomberg at IMS Consulting.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Opinion

    FDA And Companies Must Move Quickly On Drug Recalls

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    When a drug doesn't work as promised — whether it causes harm, like eyedrops recalled last month by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or is merely useless, like a widely used decongestant ingredient recently acknowledged by the agency to be ineffective — the public must be notified in a timely manner, says Vineet Dubey at Custodio & Dubey.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

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    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

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