Personal Injury & Medical Malpractice

  • February 16, 2024

    Camp Lejeune Plaintiffs Seek Appeal Of Jury Trial Denial

    Two plaintiffs suing the federal government over water contamination at Camp Lejeune are asking a North Carolina federal court to allow them to appeal a judges' decision striking their bid for a jury trial, saying the issue is a novel question of law that should be answered sooner rather than later.

  • February 16, 2024

    Therapy Co.'s Policy Lie Bars Fraud Coverage, 4th Circ. Says

    A defunct child therapy practice is not entitled to coverage for suits accusing one of the practice's employees of pretending to be licensed, the Fourth Circuit affirmed in a published opinion Friday, saying a material misrepresentation in the clinic's insurance applications warrants rescission of the policy.

  • February 16, 2024

    Trump Atty Didn't Go 'Rogue' In Pushing Club NDA, Court Told

    A former server suing a Trump Organization golf club over a nondisclosure agreement that she was allegedly illegally induced to sign by one of Donald Trump's lawyers has urged a New Jersey state court to keep her suit alive, arguing that the club's motion to dismiss relies on "absurd" arguments.

  • February 16, 2024

    Supreme Court Pauses Boy Scouts Ch. 11 Plan

    The U.S. Supreme Court temporarily paused the Boy Scouts of America's Chapter 11 bankruptcy on Friday amid a dispute over nonconsensual, third-party liability waivers included in its reorganization plan, prompting the $2.5 billion trust that is compensating victims of childhood sexual abuse to suspend operations.

  • February 15, 2024

    NorCal Roundup Suit Faces Dismissal Or Transfer To MDL

    A Northern California federal judge said Thursday he'll either dismiss a proposed nationwide class action over Roundup exposure or transfer it to multidistrict litigation in California's Central District, saying, "It seems obvious that [plaintiffs] filed it in the wrong court."

  • February 15, 2024

    Gerber, Others Fight Bid For MDL On Baby Food Heavy Metals

    A group of baby food manufacturers, including Gerber Products Co., The Hain Celestial Group Inc. and Beech-Nut Nutrition Co., is urging the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation not to consolidate suits alleging that heavy metals in their products cause autism spectrum disorder and other conditions, saying there's no benefit to grouping them in an MDL.

  • February 15, 2024

    AGs Press FDA On Safeguards Against Metal In Baby Food

    Attorneys general from states across the country urged the U.S. Food and Drug Administration once again on Thursday to establish requirements that baby food producers test for lead and other metals in products headed for store shelves, citing a recent wave of childhood lead poisoning connected to recalled applesauce pouches.  

  • February 15, 2024

    Court Mulls If Claims Buyer Qualifies For Special Ch. 11 Trust

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge on Thursday considered whether a company that pursues claims on behalf of medical insurers and healthcare organizations can be paid from a specialized opioid trust created by the 2022 Chapter 11 plan of Irish pharmaceutical company Mallinckrodt PLC.

  • February 15, 2024

    Judge Doubts NY Diocese Has Enough Votes For Ch. 11 Plan

    A New York bankruptcy judge said Thursday the Roman Catholic Diocese of Rockville Centre had sufficiently explained its Chapter 11 plan to creditors, but appeared skeptical that it will garner the necessary votes for approval.

  • February 15, 2024

    Judge Says Jurors Can See J&J Ads In Talc Trial

    A Florida judge on Thursday said decades-old advertisements for Johnson & Johnson baby powder are relevant to potential punitive damages in a talc trial and he would not shield jurors from seeing them, but he scolded the company for not opting for a two-part trial on liability and punitive damages.

  • February 15, 2024

    Ex-Atty Who Lied To Grand Jury About Frauds Gets 6.5 Years

    A Manhattan federal judge sentenced a disbarred lawyer to six and a half years in prison Thursday for his 14-year, $17 million real estate Ponzi scheme, for laundering insurance scam proceeds and for his "unheard of" step of lying to a grand jury.

  • February 15, 2024

    'Romeo & Juliet' Stars Sue Paramount Again Over Nude Scene

    "Romeo & Juliet" actors Olivia Hussey and Leonard Whiting on Wednesday sued Paramount Pictures again in California state court for rereleasing the 1968 film adaption of William Shakespeare's tragedy that included a nude scene, this time arguing they never consented to the redistribution of the content for the February 2023 rerelease.

  • February 15, 2024

    Med Monitoring Claims In Philips MDL Sent Back For Review

    The judge overseeing multidistrict litigation over Koninklijke Philips NV's recalled breathing machines has declined a special master's recommendation to trim claims seeking medical monitoring for some users, instead sending the case back for a deeper look at which states would allow such claims or whether they required proof of physical injury.

  • February 15, 2024

    Cole Scott Faces DQ Bid In Fla. Crash Suit Over Atty

    Cole Scott & Kissane PA should be booted from representing the defendants in a car wreck lawsuit because it failed to disclose that a firm attorney formerly represented the plaintiff in a different crash case that has become an issue in the current one, the plaintiff told a Florida federal court Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    4E Agent Floats Plan To Hand Disputed Atty Fees To Creditors

    The Chapter 11 agent for hand sanitizer maker 4E Brands Northamerica LLC has asked a Texas bankruptcy judge to approve a modified reorganization plan that would allow unsecured creditors to recover fees that Jackson Walker LLP may be forced to disgorge over an ethics scandal involving a former partner.

  • February 15, 2024

    LA Attorney Says The Barnes Firm Owes Him About $6M

    In litigation related to the now-defunct personal injury giant Cellino & Barnes, a California attorney is arguing that successor law firms defrauded him during severance negotiations and now owe him about $6 million.

  • February 15, 2024

    Petition Watch: Classes, Litigation Changes & Fraud Theories

    The U.S. Supreme Court receives thousands of petitions for review each term, but only a few make the news. Here, Law360 looks at four petitions filed in the past three weeks that you might've missed, including questions over how courts should analyze class certification bids and regulations restricting specific speech for content-neutral reasons, whether plaintiffs must reestablish standing after amending lawsuits, and what constitutes fraud.

  • February 15, 2024

    ICE Reaches Settlement Over Mistaken Raid On Couple

    The government has reached a settlement with an elderly Boston woman and the estate of her longtime partner over a mistaken 2019 U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement raid on their apartment by agents who had the wrong address for a suspect, according to a Thursday court filing.

  • February 15, 2024

    Pearl Harbor Cleanup Needs Fuller Accounting, Watchdog Says

    Cleaning pollution from fuel spills near the U.S. Navy base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, could take decades, but the U.S. Department of Defense's reports to Congress only include cost estimates through this year, making planning difficult, a government watchdog has warned.

  • February 14, 2024

    'Stupid' To Grant Baby Food Mass Tort Fees Now, Judge Says

    A California judge said Wednesday that he thinks it is "stupid" to grant food companies, including Walmart, more than $600,000 in legal costs following their win in a lawsuit alleging a child's autism was caused by heavy metals in baby food, but it is unclear what the law requires.

  • February 14, 2024

    Epstein Survivors Say FBI's 'Botched' Probes Allowed Abuse

    Twelve survivors of sexual predator Jeffrey Epstein claim the FBI failed to investigate numerous allegations that he was trafficking and sexually assaulting young women and children, allowing the abuse to continue for more than two decades, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday in New York federal court.

  • February 14, 2024

    NY Top Court Weighs Weinstein's 'Prior Bad Acts' Evidence

    New York's highest court asked tough questions of all sides as they heard former Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein's appeal of his rape conviction Wednesday, focusing on whether it was fair to present accusations of uncharged crimes to the jury.

  • February 14, 2024

    Colo. Hospital Sued For Denying Gender Dysphoria Surgery

    A patient is suing the Children's Hospital Colorado for discrimination and allegedly violating state law after a new policy barred surgical treatment for gender dysphoria, leading to the immediate cancellation of all surgeries for transgender patients, according to a suit filed Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    Mo. Hospital Faces Action Over Breach Of 500K Patients' Data

    A Missouri hospital has been hit with a proposed class action after allegedly taking five months to notify more than 500,000 patients that their sensitive information had been compromised, according to a complaint filed in Missouri federal court.

  • February 14, 2024

    San Francisco's Ankle Monitor Rules Put On Hold

    A federal judge in California has halted the San Francisco Sheriff's Office from enforcing rules that forced criminal defendants released pretrial under electronic monitoring to agree to be subjected to warrantless and suspicionless searches at any time and allow their GPS data to be shared among law enforcement agencies, court documents show.

Expert Analysis

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Opinion

    What Happens If High Court Rejects Releases In Purdue Ch. 11

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    Reading the tea leaves following the U.S. Supreme Court's recent arguments in Harrington v. Purdue Pharma, it appears likely that the justices will decide that bankruptcy courts lack the power to release third-party claims against nondebtors, which would result in one of three scenarios, says Gregory Germain at Syracuse University.

  • FDA's Recent Litigation Records Are Strong, But Imperfect

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    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notched its share of litigation wins in recent years thanks to a number of key advantages, but the FDA has been less successful in certain highly visible arenas, Jonathan Berman and Colleen Heisey at Jones Day.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Insurer's '600-Lb. Life' Win Shows Why Fraud Suits Don't Stick

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    A Texas federal court’s recent ruling that Philadelphia Indemnity Co. did not fraudulently induce Megalomedia, the production company behind reality show “My 600-Lb. Life,” into purchasing insurance, demonstrates why a policyholder’s fraudulent inducement claim against an insurer will rarely succeed, says Robert Tugander at Rivkin Radler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Aviation Watch: Pilots Face Mental Health Catch-22

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    The recent case of an Alaska Airlines pilot who attempted to crash an airliner in flight highlights the dilemma facing federally licensed cockpit personnel who need psychological help, yet could lose their jobs if they seek it — but a long-running program may provide a solution, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • How Purdue High Court Case Will Shape Ch. 11 Mass Injury

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent arguments in Harrington v. Purdue Pharma, addressing the authority of bankruptcy courts to approve nonconsensual third-party releases in Chapter 11 settlement plans, highlight the case's wide-ranging implications for how mass injury cases get resolved in bankruptcy proceedings, says George Singer at Holland & Hart.

  • How New Expert Rules Are Already Changing Court Decisions

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    Though not formally effective until last week, some courts have been relying for several years on amended federal rules clarifying judges’ gatekeeping role, so counsel should be prepared to justify their expert witnesses’ methodologies and expect additional motion practice on expert testimony admissibility, say Colleen Kenney and Daniel Kelly at Sidley.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Pa. Court's Venue Ruling Is Likely To Worsen Forum Shopping

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    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court’s recent Hangey v. Husqvarna decision claims to narrowly clarify the standard for evaluating whether a venue is proper, but has broader implications that are likely to exacerbate the forum-shopping problem that already plagues corporate defendants in Pennsylvania, says Stefanie Pitcavage Mekilo and Joseph Schaeffer at Babst Calland.

  • 2nd Circ. Defamation Ruling May Chill NY Title IX Reports

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision, holding accusers in Connecticut Title IX sexual misconduct cases are not immune to defamation claims, means that New York higher education institutions should reassess whether their disciplinary hearing procedures both protect due process and encourage victim and witness participation, says Nicole Donatich at Cullen and Dykman.

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