Personal Injury & Medical Malpractice

  • April 10, 2024

    Jet Co. Can't Escape Suit Over Plane Depleting Fuel, Crashing

    A Florida federal judge declined to dismiss a lawsuit filed by a passenger alleging negligence after his chartered plane ran out of fuel and crashed into the ocean, saying the liability waiver cited by the private jet company and pilot can't be enforced under the Warsaw Convention.

  • April 10, 2024

    Apple, Live Nation Unit Denied Bids To Beat Astroworld Claims

    A Texas state judge has rejected bids by Apple Inc. and ticketing and security companies to avoid trial in sprawling lawsuits over their potential responsibility for a fatal crush of spectators at a concert three years ago featuring rapper Travis Scott.

  • April 10, 2024

    NBC, Universal Sued Over 'Harry Potter' Ride Malfunction

    Riders who were stuck for over an hour on a ride at the Wizarding World of Harry Potter in Universal Studios Hollywood that left them suspended midair have sued NBCUniversal and the theme park in California court, accusing them of negligently failing to safely maintain the attraction.

  • April 10, 2024

    NC Justices Doubt Homeowner's Attic Fall Suit Can Go To Jury

    The North Carolina Supreme Court appeared likely Wednesday to rule against a homeowner who fell through an attic hole left by a builder, with the justices suggesting her actions may have played a part in her injury.

  • April 10, 2024

    Settlements Prompt SC Cheer Abuse Case Dismissal

    Four suits levying sexual abuse allegations against competitive cheerleading's power brokers have been tossed from South Carolina federal court as a series of settlements have shifted the focus of the litigation from corporate giants to individual gyms and coaches.

  • April 10, 2024

    Talc Death Liability Should Have Been Even Split, Panel Finds

    A Pennsylvania appeals court on Wednesday partially reversed a $400,000 verdict in a mesothelioma suit against American International Industries, with a panel finding the trial court should have split the verdict in even thirds, rather than putting 50% of it on AII.

  • April 10, 2024

    Major Lindsey Wins Bid To Have Sex Assault Suit Arbitrated

    A former Major Lindsey & Africa LLC employee's sexual assault lawsuit against the legal recruiting giant must go to arbitration, a New York state judge has decided.

  • April 09, 2024

    After Uproar, New MDL Rule Advances With Attys Assuaged

    Following years of debate and months of outcry, a judicial panel Tuesday approved the first formal rule aimed at improving efficiency and fairness in the nation's burgeoning realm of multidistrict litigation, earning plaudits from placated lawyers in the defense and plaintiffs bars.

  • April 09, 2024

    What's In The Norfolk Southern $600M Derailment Deal

    Last year's fiery Norfolk Southern train derailment and toxic chemical spill in East Palestine, Ohio, reached a litigation milestone Tuesday with the disaster's first major settlement, a proposed $600 million deal with nearby residents and businesses, but the rail giant must still contend with a federal investigation and other lawsuits.

  • April 09, 2024

    Hawaiian Electric Brass Hit With Suit Over Wildfire Preparation

    A Hawaiian Electric Industries Inc. shareholder has alleged in a derivative suit that the company's executives and directors knew that it was not prepared for last year's deadly Maui wildfire, which caused reputational and financial damage to the company.

  • April 09, 2024

    Colo. Justices Admit Rulings Caused Claims Clock Confusion

    The Colorado Supreme Court has concluded that some of its past decisions sowed confusion about how much time minors have to file personal injury claims, and clarified that a woman who relied on the prior precedent to sue in state court over her bike accident had waited too long.

  • April 09, 2024

    Court Axes Subpoena Of Ex-Wife In 1st Abortion Death Suit

    The woman at the center of the nation's first abortion wrongful death suit since the landmark Dobbs decision need not produce info about how she allegedly obtained abortion-inducing drugs from two women, a Texas appeals court ruled Tuesday, saying doing so would violate the woman's Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination.

  • April 09, 2024

    Wash. High Court Leaves Gun Magazine Ban In Place

    The Washington state Supreme Court has paused a judge's ruling that the state's law banning the sale of large-capacity magazines for firearms is unconstitutional.

  • April 09, 2024

    AT&T, Dominion Beat OAN's Claims In Defamation Fight

    A D.C. federal judge tossed One America News's complaint claiming AT&T must indemnify it from Dominion's defamation suit over voter fraud misinformation since AT&T breached disparagement clauses in its contract with the TV channel, finding OAN has not shown Dominion's suit was prompted by public criticisms by TV personalities and AT&T's board chair.

  • April 09, 2024

    Ex-Haitian Mayor Can't Nix Mass. Jury's $15.5M Torture Verdict

    A Boston federal judge has refused to toss a $15.5 million civil verdict finding a former Haitian mayor responsible for torture and extrajudicial violence against rival political party members.

  • April 09, 2024

    EPA Reaches $1.4M Deal With Chemical Co. Over Plant Fire

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Monday said that it had recently reached a settlement with Houston-based Sasol Chemicals LLC over a 2022 chemical plant explosion in Westlake, Louisiana, over which the company agreed to pay more than $1.4 million in civil penalties and fix violations.

  • April 09, 2024

    Smith & Wesson Can't Keep Mass Shooting Case In Fed. Court

    The Seventh Circuit ruled Monday that Smith & Wesson must litigate in state court lawsuits brought by survivors and the families of victims who were killed or wounded in the July 4, 2022, Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting, rejecting the gunmaker's argument that its compliance with federal regulators mandated federal jurisdiction.

  • April 09, 2024

    Jury Must Hear Terrorism Payments Were Extortion, Chiquita Says

    Banana company Chiquita argued Tuesday it should not be blocked from presenting evidence about threats made to its employees by a Colombian paramilitary group and about other businesses making payments to the group at a coming bellwether trial in a long-running multidistrict litigation accusing Chiquita of funding the paramilitary group that allegedly killed the plaintiffs' relatives.

  • April 09, 2024

    Feds Want To Push Back Complex Camp Lejeune Cases

    The federal government has asked the North Carolina court overseeing litigation concerning contaminated water at Camp Lejeune to first try cases brought by former residents of the Marine base who allege they have developed only one disease from the water and try more complicated cases later.

  • April 09, 2024

    Tenn. Justices Don't Let Trader Joe's Avoid Direct Claims

    The Tennessee Supreme Court has decided not to let Trader Joe's East Inc. escape direct liability and premises liability claims in a slip-and-fall suit by admitting that one of its employees is at fault, saying that the rule the store proposed doesn't fit with the state's comparative fault system.

  • April 09, 2024

    Boies Schiller Attys Face Sanctions Bid Over Epstein Suit

    Boies Schiller Flexner LLP's chairman and a co-managing partner are facing a sanctions bid from associates of billionaire and sexual predator Jeffrey Epstein for filing a proposed class action against them despite the attorneys' clients previously signing releases of liability to receive victim compensation.

  • April 09, 2024

    Ga. Firm Fights Sanctions Bid For Pursuing COVID-19 Suit

    A Georgia law firm has urged a federal court to reject a sanctions motion against it for pursuing claims that businesses failed to protect a worker against catching COVID-19, arguing the bid is untimely and saying the companies made misleading statements about the case in their request.

  • April 09, 2024

    NJ Justices To Hear If Philly Archdiocese Subject To NJ Court

    The New Jersey Supreme Court will determine whether the Archdiocese of Philadelphia is subject to Garden State courts in a lawsuit alleging a former priest sexually abused a teenager at the former priest's Jersey Shore house decades ago.

  • April 09, 2024

    Norfolk Southern Settles Train Derailment Suits For $600M

    Norfolk Southern Corp. has agreed to settle the consolidated class action claims brought against it over its tragic train derailment and toxic chemical spill in East Palestine, Ohio, for $600 million, according to a joint motion filed in federal court Tuesday.

  • April 09, 2024

    EPA Finalizes Rule Cutting Cancer-Causing Emissions

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday finalized restrictions on cancer-causing emissions including ethylene oxide and chloroprene from chemical plants that the agency says will reduce nearby vulnerable populations' risk of cancer and other health problems.

Expert Analysis

  • Aviation Watch: 737 Max Blowout Raises Major Safety Issues

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    The sudden in-flight loss of a side panel on an Alaska Air 737-9 Max last month, leaving a gaping hole in the side of the plane's cabin, highlighted ongoing quality issues at Boeing, the jet's manufacturer — but the failure also arose from decisions made by the airline, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • EDNY Ruling Charts 99 Problems In Rap Lyric Admissibility

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    A New York federal court’s recent ruling in U.S. v. Jordan powerfully captures courts’ increasing skepticism about the admissibility of rap lyrics as evidence in criminal trials, particularly at a time when artists face economic incentives to embrace fictional, hyperbolic narratives, say attorneys at Sher Tremonte.

  • 3 Principles For Minimizing The Risk Of A Nuclear Verdict

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    In one of the latest examples of so-called nuclear verdicts, a single plaintiff was awarded $2.25 billion in a jury trial against Monsanto — revealing the need for defense attorneys to prioritize trust, connection and simplicity when communicating with modern juries, say Jenny Hergenrother and Mia Falzarano at Alston & Bird.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Verizon Benefits Ruling Clears Up Lien Burden Of Proof

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    A Rhode Island federal court recently ruled that a Verizon benefits plan could not recoup a former employee’s settlement funds from the attorney who represented her in a personal injury case, importantly clarifying two Employee Retirement Income Security Act burden of proof issues that were previously unsettled, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Law.

  • Googling Prospective Jurors Is Usually A Fool's Errand

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    Though a Massachusetts federal court recently barred Google from Googling potential jurors in a patent infringement case, the company need not worry about missing evidence of bias, because internet research of jury pools usually doesn’t yield the most valuable information — voir dire and questionnaires do, says Sarah Murray at Trialcraft.

  • A Look Into How Jurors Reach High Damages Awards

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    In the wake of several large jury awards, Richard Gabriel and Emily Shaw at Decision Analysis shed light on challenges that jurors have in deciding them, the nonevidentiary and extra-legal methods they use to do so, and new research about the themes and jury characteristics of high-damages jurors.

  • Opinion

    Food Safety Bill Needed To Protect Kids From Heavy Metals

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    The recent announcement by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that hundreds of children may have been exposed to unsafe lead levels in applesauce highlights the continuing failure by Congress to pass legislation that would require baby food manufacturers to ensure safer levels of heavy metals in their products, says Vineet Dubey at Custodio & Dubey.

  • Opinion

    3rd-Party Financiers Have Power To Drive Mass Tort Cases

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    The abnormal recovery premium presented by modern mass tort cases coupled with their deemphasized role for attorneys creates an opportunity for third-party financiers to both create and control these cases, says Samir Parikh at Lewis & Clark Law School.

  • Preparing For A New Wave Of Litigation Under Silicosis Rules

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    After the Division of Occupational Safety and Health of California issued an emergency temporary standard to combat noncompliance with assessments of workers' exposure to particles of crystalline silica, companies that manufacture, distribute or sell silica-containing products will need aggressive case-specific discovery to navigate a new wave of litigation, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Managing Competing Priorities In Witness Preparation

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    There’s often a divide between what attorneys and witnesses want out of the deposition process, but litigation teams can use several strategies to resolve this tension and help witnesses be more comfortable with the difficult conditions of testifying, say Ava Hernández and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Opinion

    Gilead Ruling Signals That Innovating Can Lead To Liability

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    A California appeals court's ruling last month in Gilead Life Sciences v. Superior Court of San Francisco that a drug manufacturer can be held liable for delaying the introduction of an improved version of its medication raises concerns about the chilling effects that expansive product liability claims may have on innovation, says Gary Myers at the University of Missouri School of Law.

  • Understanding And Working With The Millennials On Your Jury

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    Every trial attorney will be facing a greater proportion of millennials on their jury, as they now comprise the largest generation in the U.S., and winning them over requires an understanding of their views on politics, corporations and damages, says Clint Townson at Townson Litigation Consulting.

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