Personal Injury & Medical Malpractice

  • March 25, 2024

    Boeing CEO To Exit At Year's End Amid 737 Max Crisis

    The Boeing Co. announced Monday that President and CEO Dave Calhoun will exit the company at the end of the year, and the chair of its board will also step down, as the American aerospace giant overhauls its leadership ranks amid an enduring 737 Max crisis.

  • March 25, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear MAGA Hat Teen's Media Defamation Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review a Sixth Circuit decision dismissing a suit against several media companies from a man who says they defamed him with their coverage of his encounter with a Native American activist while he was a teenager wearing a "Make America Great Again" hat.

  • March 22, 2024

    Social Media MDL Jury Issue Put On Hold For Justices' Ruling

    A California federal judge said Friday that she will await the U.S. Supreme Court's anticipated decision in SEC v. Jarkesy before deciding whether states' claims in multidistrict litigation over social media platforms' allegedly addictive design must go to a jury, after the plaintiffs' counsel argued that the case before the high court could implicate tech companies' Seventh Amendment rights.

  • March 22, 2024

    Airbnb Sued Over Conn. Woman's Fatal Burns In Jamaica

    Airbnb has taken to Connecticut federal court to defend against claims that it is financially responsible for an explosion at a Jamaican rental property that caused first-degree burns over 56% of a renter's body, eventually leading to the woman's death in the U.S. two months later.

  • March 22, 2024

    Patient Asks NC Justices To Skip Immunity Review Of Virus Law

    A patient who claims she nearly died from a botched hysterectomy urged the North Carolina Supreme Court to ignore a hospital's bid to expand the immunity healthcare providers can receive under the state's COVID-19 emergency law, arguing the medical providers conflate common law and statutory immunity.

  • March 22, 2024

    Apple AirTag Judge Open To Injunctive Cert. In Stalking Suit

    A California federal judge overseeing claims that Apple Inc. failed to safeguard its AirTag tracking device from being abused by stalkers said Friday it's "exceedingly unlikely" a proposed damages class will be certified, but a proposed class seeking injunctive relief is likely to snag certification, at least on some claims.

  • March 22, 2024

    Bestwall Says 'Texas Two-Step' Irrelevant To Asbestos Ch. 11

    Bestwall, the bankrupt asbestos unit of Georgia-Pacific, told the U.S. Supreme Court Friday that a pre-bankruptcy corporate restructuring in Texas that separated its asbestos liability from the parent business should not matter in determining whether a bankruptcy court has jurisdiction over the subsidiary's asbestos injury claims.

  • March 22, 2024

    Judge Cuts ICE Contractor, Keeps US In Medical Abuse Suit

    A Georgia federal judge on Friday left standing only a narrow sliver of class claims against the federal government from immigrant women alleging they underwent invasive, unnecessary medical procedures while in federal custody, dismissing the bulk of their lawsuit.

  • March 22, 2024

    Final OK Sought For Economic Loss Deal In CPAP Recall MDL

    Users of Philips' recalled CPAP breathing machines have asked a Pennsylvania federal judge to give her final OK to their $467.5 million settlement with the company to cover economic loss claims, arguing only a few objections to the deal remain.

  • March 22, 2024

    Ill. Justices Won't Stop Exec Email Defamation Suit

    A Chicago software company must face a defamation suit over two anonymous, disparaging emails sent to a competitor's executives, Illinois' top justices have ruled, finding a company's reputation can be harmed even by messages sent only to top-level leaders. 

  • March 22, 2024

    Firearms Co. Agrees To Dissolve Amid Conn. 'Ghost Gun' Suit

    One of four firearms companies that the Connecticut attorney general sued in 2023 over the online sale of "ghost gun" parts has stopped operating and agreed to dissolve, according to a stipulated judgment that would release Florida-based Steel Fox Firearms Inc. from the litigation.

  • March 22, 2024

    'Love Is Blind' Contestant's Suit Sent To Arbitration

    A California judge on Friday held that claims against Netflix from a "Love Is Blind" contestant alleging she was matched with a violent drug addict must be sent to arbitration after finding that the arbitrability of the contract in question is not for the court to decide.

  • March 22, 2024

    Push For Camp Lejeune Jury Trials Seen As Long Shot

    The legal strategy to secure jury trials in the massive Camp Lejeune water contamination case hangs on a single phrase in a special law stating "nothing" shall impair such trials, but the plaintiffs' gambit is a long shot because Congress didn't go far enough in creating a framework for such trials against the government.

  • March 22, 2024

    Off The Bench: Ohtani Lawyers Up, UFC Settles, ACC Clash

    MLB superstar Shohei Ohtani enlists a Hollywood boutique to advise him amid a still-unfolding sports betting scandal, UFC forks over $335 million to settle a wage class action and Clemson's bid to join a new conference spills into court. Catch up with the sports and betting stories that had Law360's readers talking with this week's Off The Bench.

  • March 22, 2024

    Dollar General Can't Nix $1.48M Slip-And-Fall Verdict

    A Florida appeals panel on Friday affirmed a $1.48 million slip-and-fall verdict against Dollar General, saying the company "falls far short" of showing that there was no evidence it was aware of water on the floor after bringing a pair of carts in from the rain.

  • March 22, 2024

    Ex-Drug Rep Won't Serve More Time After 1st Circ. Victory

    The second sentencing of a former Aegerion Pharmaceuticals Inc. salesman did not add a day in prison to the roughly seven months he served before the First Circuit wiped away his initial conviction on charges he schemed to fraudulently sell the company's cholesterol treatment.

  • March 22, 2024

    Cuomo Sister May Sit For Retaliation Claim Depo, Judge Says

    A Manhattan federal judge provisionally held Friday that Madeline Cuomo, the sister of former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, should sit for a deposition to address claims that she facilitated an effort to retaliate against a woman who has accused the former governor of harassment.

  • March 22, 2024

    LifeCell Cleared Of Liability In NJ Strattice Hernia Mesh Trial

    New Jersey state jurors on Friday cleared LifeCell of liability in a Kentucky woman's suit alleging the design of its Strattice surgical mesh is defective and caused a hernia to reoccur and ultimately resulted in "life-altering" surgery, giving the medical device company the first win in a venue with at least 93 pending cases with tort claims over the mesh.

  • March 21, 2024

    5th Circ. Backs FDA's Vivid Warnings Of Cigarette Dangers

    Government mandated text warnings and graphic images on cigarette packs to advertise the health risks of smoking do not violate the free speech rights of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. and other cigarette manufacturers, the Fifth Circuit ruled Thursday, saying the warnings are "factual and uncontroversial" and pass constitutional muster.

  • March 21, 2024

    10th Circ. Doubts Officers Can Get Redo In Training Attack

    A Tenth Circuit panel was skeptical Thursday that tactical officers at a Colorado supermax prison can challenge a trial court's decision not to hold an evidentiary hearing in a suit about a training exercise that turned violent, with one judge noting that the officers did not object at the time.

  • March 21, 2024

    MDL Claims Over Merck's Gardasil Vax Get Trimmed

    Pharmaceutical giant Merck need not face many of the claims by patients who allege their autoimmune conditions were caused by its HPV vaccine, a North Carolina federal judge overseeing multidistrict litigation ruled, saying the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act bars most claims made in the first two bellwethers.

  • March 21, 2024

    'Access Hollywood' Tape Key To Trump Verdict, 2nd Circ. Told

    Writer E. Jean Carroll urged the Second Circuit on Wednesday not to undo a $5 million verdict finding that Donald Trump sexually abused and defamed her, saying the jury rightly viewed the former president's infamous "Access Hollywood" tape because it revealed "his modus operandi."

  • March 21, 2024

    Social Media Cos. 'Can't Hold Back' Execs In MDL, Judge Says

    A California federal magistrate judge warned social media companies Thursday that they must disclose relevant executive witnesses in high-stakes multidistrict litigation over social media's allegedly addictive design after plaintiffs' counsel complained that Meta and Snap's CEOs weren't identified in initial disclosures, telling defense counsel "you can't hold them back."

  • March 21, 2024

    Year Deadline On Inspection Tort Is 'Absurd,' Ga. Justices Told

    A lawyer for the family of a man who was killed when his home's retaining wall collapsed told the Supreme Court of Georgia on Thursday that the home's inspector should be liable for his death, calling a one-year cutoff on litigation asserted by the inspector "absurd."

  • March 21, 2024

    Varsity Cheer Victim Sees Claims Cut In NC Sex Abuse Suit

    Two North Carolina cheer coaches and the U.S. All Star Federation have escaped claims they flouted federal law by failing to report the sexual abuse of a young athlete, with a judge finding they can't be held liable for "aiding and abetting" the alleged abuse.

Expert Analysis

  • Cases Linking Baby Food, Autism Pose Causation Challenges

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    Major baby food producers are now in the crosshairs of regulators, consumer advocates and plaintiffs attorneys over allegations their products contain heavy metals that harm children's development — but it will be difficult for plaintiffs to establish causation, as shown by the lengthy court battles over tobacco and talc, says Vineet Dubey at Custodio & Dubey.

  • Suits Likely Over Nevada Law Limiting Claimant Injury Exams

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    A new Nevada law placing barriers on the mental or physical examinations that defendants use to evaluate claimants' injuries will likely spur waves of litigation to reconcile it with existing rules and practice, says Michael Lowry at Wilson Elser.

  • Maximizing Law Firm Profitability In Uncertain Times

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    As threats of an economic downturn loom, firms can boost profits by embracing the power of bottom-line management and creating an ecosystem where strategic financial oversight and robust timekeeping practices meet evolved client relations, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Strategic Consulting.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Reminds Attys That CBP Can Search Devices

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent Malik v. Department of Homeland Security decision adds to the chorus of federal courts holding that border agents don’t need a warrant to search travelers’ electronic devices, so attorneys should consider certain special precautions to secure privileged information when reentering the U.S., says Jennifer Freel at Jackson Walker.

  • The Likable Witness: 6 Personality Archetypes To Cultivate

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    During pretrial witness preparation sessions, a few key methods can help identify the likable personality type a witness intuitively expresses, which can then be amplified at trial to create an emotional connection with jurors, says Gillian Drake at On Trial Associates.

  • Avoiding The Ethical Pitfalls Of Crowdfunded Legal Fees

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    The crowdfunding of legal fees has become increasingly common, providing a new way for people to afford legal services, but attorneys who accept crowdsourced funds must remember several key ethical obligations to mitigate their risks, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • The Likable Witness: Key Traits And Psychological Concepts

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    Though witnesses must appear credible to juries, they should also be likable in order to make an emotional connection, and certain gestural, behavioral and psychological aspects of their testimony can be modified to improve their perceived likability, says Gillian Drake at On Trial Associates.

  • What Large Language Models Mean For Document Review

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    Courts often subject parties using technology assisted review to greater scrutiny than parties conducting linear, manual document review, so parties using large language models for document review should expect even more attention, along with a corresponding need for quality control and validation, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Tips For Camp Lejeune Attorneys To Mitigate TCPA Suit Risks

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    To retain and assist Camp Lejeune clients, it is vital to understand best practices to avoid violating the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, which has been at the center of recent lawsuits against attorneys seeking to reach veterans and their families affected by the toxic water exposure at the Marine Corps base, says Libby Vish at SimplyConvert.

  • Series

    Participating In Living History Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My role as a baron in a living history group, and my work as volunteer corporate counsel for a book series fan association, has provided me several opportunities to practice in unexpected areas of law — opening doors to experiences that have nurtured invaluable personal and professional skills, says Matthew Parker at the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.

  • How Attys Can Weather The Next Disaster Litigation Crisis

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    On the heels of a number of damage catastrophes and ensuing litigation this summer alone, attorneys must recognize that it’s a matter of when, not if, the next disaster — whether natural or artificial — will strike, and formulate plans to minimize risks, including consolidating significant claims and taking remedial measures, says Mark Goldberg at Cosmich Simmons.

  • Opinion

    Private Equity Owners Can Remedy Law Firms' Agency Issues

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    Nonlawyer, private-equity ownership of law firms can benefit shareholders and others vulnerable to governance issues such as disparate interests, and can in turn help resolve agency problems, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • The 3 E's Of Limiting Injury Liability For Worker Misconduct

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent ruling in TNT Crane & Rigging v. Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission lays out key safety practices — establish, educate and enforce — that not only can help protect workers, but also shield companies from workplace injury liability in situations when an employee ignores or intentionally breaks the rules, says Andrew Alvarado at Dickinson Wright.

  • Opinion

    Proving Causation Is Key To Fairness And Justice

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    Ongoing litigation over talc and acetaminophen highlights the important legal distinction between correlation and causation — and is a reminder that, while individuals should be compensated for injuries, blameless parties should be protected from unjust claims, say Drew Kershen at the University of Oklahoma College of Law, and Henry Miller at the American Council on Science and Health.

  • Okla. Workers' Comp Case Could Mean Huge Shift In Claims

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    An Oklahoma appeals court's recent opinion in Prewitt v. Quiktrip Corp. may expand the scope of continuing medical maintenance orders in workers' compensation cases to unprecedented levels — with potentially major consequences for employers and insurers, says Steven Hanna at Gilson Daub.

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