Personal Injury & Medical Malpractice

  • March 19, 2024

    NC Med Mal Appeal Remains Dismissed Over Timeliness

    A North Carolina appeals panel on Tuesday declined to revive a family's medical malpractice wrongful death suit against a doctor and physician group, saying even if the court sets aside the rules violations that doomed the appeal before, it must still be dismissed for being filed too late.

  • March 19, 2024

    2nd Circ. Says 'Mandate Rule' Gives Judges Little Leeway

    A district court judge must hold a new trial if there are instructions for one when a case is remanded, the Second Circuit said Tuesday in an order reviving an excessive force case, clarifying lower courts can defy such mandates only in "very limited" circumstances.

  • March 19, 2024

    OptumRx Can't Get Motley Rice Disqualified From Opioid MDL

    An Ohio federal judge has denied a bid by pharmacy benefit manager OptumRx to disqualify Motley Rice LLC from representing plaintiffs in the national opioid litigation, saying the company hasn't shown that the firm's prior representation of states investigating opioids puts the company at a disadvantage in the multidistrict litigation.

  • March 18, 2024

    NYC Mayor Accused Of Sexually Assaulting Former Colleague

    A woman sued New York City Mayor Eric Adams on Monday under the state's Adult Survivors Act, alleging he demanded quid pro quo sexual favors and sexually assaulted her after she sought career advice from him in 1993.

  • March 18, 2024

    Trump Claims ABC Aired False Info About Rape Accusations

    Former President Donald Trump on Monday lobbed defamation claims at ABC News and one of its hosts, claiming that they knowingly broadcast false and defamatory statements regarding Trump's liability stemming from writer E. Jean Carroll's multiple lawsuits against him.

  • March 18, 2024

    Larry H. Parker, Who Vowed To 'Fight For You' In Ads, Dies

    Los Angeles personal injury and automobile accident lawyer Larry H. Parker, whose television advertisements and billboards vowing to "fight for you" have been a fixture in Southern California for decades, has died at age 75.

  • March 18, 2024

    Gasket Maker That Sued Asbestos Lawyers Faces SC Trial

    A major gasket maker that has previously sued asbestos lawyers for unfairly targeting it went to trial in South Carolina on Monday against claims by a mesothelioma patient's widow that the company skipped necessary safety testing.

  • March 18, 2024

    Doc Production Is 'Not That Hard,' MDL Judge Tells Snap's Atty

    A California magistrate judge laid out incentives Monday to spur depositions and document production in multidistrict litigation over social media's allegedly addictive design, rejecting defense counsel's arguments the incentives are "lopsided," and telling Snap's counsel document production is "not as hard as you're saying it is."

  • March 18, 2024

    Fla. Doc's Patient Info Subpoena Seeks Too Much, Court Says

    A Florida state trial judge shouldn't have approved subpoenas seeking a decade's worth of medical records from a patient who filed a malpractice suit against a doctor and hospital system, an appeals court has ruled, saying the defendants were allowed to cast "too wide a net."

  • March 18, 2024

    How A Car Crash And 20 Years Of Litigation Ended With $25M

    A $25.5 million verdict returned by a Georgia jury for the family of a woman killed in a 2003 taxi crash was the result of decades of litigation perseverance, with more work ahead to help ensure that a similar tragedy does not occur, her family's lawyer told Law360.

  • March 18, 2024

    Trucking Co. Won't Get New Trial For $78M Crash Judgment

    A Detroit judge said on Monday that attorneys for a father and son killed in a 2018 tractor-trailer crash did not commit misconduct by telling a jury about the circumstances leading up to the crash because they were trying to prove damages for the fright the two experienced before they died.

  • March 18, 2024

    Justices Tilt Toward NRA In Free Speech Row With Regulator

    A cautious U.S. Supreme Court seemed poised Monday to rule in favor of the National Rifle Association in a case over allegations that a former New York state official pressured financial institutions to cut ties to the National Rifle Association in violation of its free speech rights.

  • March 18, 2024

    Ga. Surgery Biz's False Claims Penalty Boosted To $5.4M

    A Georgia surgical center and its former head must now pay $5.4 million to end a kickback scheme tied to the indictment of the state's former insurance commissioner, an increase from a previous $3 million penalty that the federal government said the clinic and doctor had shirked.

  • March 18, 2024

    4th Circ. Sends Opioid 'Nuisance' Question To W.Va. Top Court

    The Fourth Circuit asked West Virginia's high court Monday to determine whether the state's public nuisance law can be used to target companies that shipped drugs to pharmacies in a community ravaged by addiction, a crucial question in litigation spawned by the opioid crisis.

  • March 18, 2024

    Son Of Late Football Player With Brain Condition Sues NCAA

    The son of a former college football player who died in 2018 and was later diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy sued the NCAA Monday in Indianapolis federal court, accusing it of negligence and wrongful death for knowing about the risks to players' health during the 1960s but ignoring them.

  • March 18, 2024

    Amazon, Bumkins Accused Of Not Flagging 'Superbibs' Chemical

    Amazon and baby products manufacturer Bumkins Finer Baby Products face a lawsuit in California state court alleging they sell DC Comics-themed "Superbibs" meant for feeding infants without warning customers as the law requires that they contain perfluorooctanoic acid, a "forever chemical" that may cause certain cancers and reproductive problems.

  • March 18, 2024

    Tesla Trial To Test Bounds Of Autonomous Cars' Future

    An upcoming California trial seeking to hold Tesla accountable for the death of a driver who had been playing games on his cellphone while his vehicle was in Autopilot may force the auto industry to recalibrate its approach to advanced driver-assistance systems, as developers pushing fully autonomous transportation stare down the threat of new legal landmines, experts say.

  • March 18, 2024

    Apple Beats Most Claims In AirTag Stalking Suit, For Now

    A California federal judge has dismissed the majority of a proposed class action accusing Apple of not doing enough to safeguard its AirTag tracking device from being abused by stalkers, saying that apart from a few negligence and product liability claims under Golden State law, the rest need to be reworked.

  • March 18, 2024

    Colo. Wildfire Plaintiffs Say Xcel Trial Plan Would Sow 'Chaos'

    Nearly 4,000 Colorado property owners suing Xcel Energy over a 2021 wildfire have argued that the utility's proposal to try all of their liability claims together would create a "chaotic and expensive mess" and potentially result in "serial juries" awarding different damages later on.

  • March 18, 2024

    Kimberly-Clark Gets OK For $6M Deal Over Tainted Wipes

    A Texas federal court has granted final approval to a deal worth as much as $17 million — with $3.6 million going to plaintiff attorney fees — that would resolve claims that paper products manufacturer Kimberly-Clark sold flushable wipes contaminated with a bacteria particularly dangerous to those with weak immune systems.

  • March 18, 2024

    Plaintiffs Call For Sanctions Over PFAS MDL Deal Threat

    A proposed class in multidistrict litigation against DuPont and others alleging they contaminated drinking water with PFAS chemicals is urging a South Carolina federal court to sanction attorneys for a California water service, saying they violated court rules in their latest objections to a settlement.

  • March 18, 2024

    Conn. Judge Won't Halt Ex-Yale Student's Case After 'Doxxing'

    A Connecticut federal judge determined Monday that acquitted former Yale University student Saifullah Khan's decision to reveal his onetime sexual assault accuser's name on X, the social media site formerly known as Twitter, isn't fatal to a defamation lawsuit against the woman despite an anonymity order.

  • March 18, 2024

    Major Lindsey Followed Rules In Sex Assault Suit, Judge Says

    A Chicago-based attorney who represents Major Lindsey & Africa LLC in an ex-employee's New York sexual assault suit did not run afoul of court requirements by sending a letter demanding that she drop the claims, a judge held Monday.

  • March 18, 2024

    EPA Bans Most Common Asbestos In 'Cancer Moonshot' Rule

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Monday finalized a ban on the most prevalent variety of asbestos, the first asbestos risk management rule issued since the Toxic Substances Control Act was amended in 2016.

  • March 18, 2024

    Doctors Keep Win In Suit Over Patient's Drowning Death

    A Georgia appeals court won't revive claims from the parents of a man who died by drowning after he was discharged from an Augusta hospital, saying the death is too far removed from his treatment and discharge, and the court can only speculate as to what led to the death.

Expert Analysis

  • Twitter Legal Fees Suit Offers Crash Course In Billing Ethics

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    X Corp.'s suit alleging that Wachtell grossly inflated its fees in the final days of Elon Musk’s Twitter acquisition provides a case study in how firms should protect their reputations by hewing to ethical billing practices and the high standards for professional conduct that govern attorney-client relationships, says Lourdes Fuentes at Karta Legal.

  • ABA's Money-Laundering Resolution Is A Balancing Act

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    While the American Bar Association’s recently passed resolution recognizes a lawyer's duty to discontinue representation that could facilitate money laundering and other fraudulent activity, it preserves, at least for now, the delicate balance of judicial, state-based regulation of the legal profession and the sanctity of the attorney-client relationship, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • Post-Mallory, Calif. Personal Jurisdiction Unlikely To Expand

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent Mallory v. Norfolk Southern Railway decision, affirming that registration to do business in Pennsylvania means consenting to be sued in that state's courts, could prompt other states to experiment with similar laws — but such efforts would likely fail in California, say Virginia Milstead and Raza Rasheed at Skadden.

  • Tapping The Full Potential Of The Juror Questionnaire

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    Most litigators know that questionnaires can reveal biases that potential jurors would never reveal in voir dire, but to maximize this tool’s utility, attorneys must choose the right questions, interpret responses effectively and weigh several other considerations, say George Speckart and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Law Firm Professional Development Steps To Thrive In AI Era

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools rapidly evolve, professional development leaders are instrumental in preparing law firms for the paradigm shifts ahead, and should consider three strategies to help empower legal talent with the skills required to succeed in an increasingly complex technological landscape, say Steve Gluckman and Anusia Gillespie at SkillBurst Interactive.

  • Opinion

    A New Strategy For Defending Spine Injury Claims

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    With spinal injury claims proliferating — often with verdicts in the seven-figure range — defense counsel can expand their current trial playbook by retaining experts to prepare and publish peer-reviewed scientific studies that can then be used in the courtroom to help juries understand the issues, says Nicholas Hurzeler at Lewis Brisbois.

  • The Basics Of Being A Knowledge Management Attorney

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Michael Lehet at Ogletree Deakins discusses the role of knowledge management attorneys at law firms, the common tasks they perform and practical tips for lawyers who may be considering becoming one.

  • Opinion

    Purdue Ch. 11 Case Exemplifies Need For 3rd-Party Releases

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    In the Purdue Pharma Chapter 11 case, the U.S. Supreme Court will eventually decide whether the Bankruptcy Code authorizes a court to approve third-party releases, but removing this powerful tool would be a significant blow to the likelihood of future victims being made whole, says Isaac Marcushamer at DGIM Law.

  • 3 Lessons From Mock Trials That Attys Can Use In Practice

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    The hordes of data gleaned from mock trial competitions can isolate the methods that maximize persuasion, providing key principles that attorneys in every practice area can incorporate into their real-world trial work, say Spencer Pahlke at Walkup Melodia and Justin Bernstein at UCLA.

  • To Hire And Keep Top Talent, Think Beyond Compensation

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    Firms seeking to appeal to sophisticated clients and top-level partners should promote mentorship, ensure that attorneys from diverse backgrounds feel valued, and clarify policies about at-home work, says Patrick Moya at Quaero Group.

  • Retailers Face Compliance Issues As PFAS Regulations Grow

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    As per- and polyfluoroalkyl substance legislation, and the potential for litigation, continues to evolve and spread nationally, retailers should focus on supply chain management, inventory audits and maintaining strong internal standard operating procedures as a way to manage compliance and minimize risk, say attorneys at Dentons.

  • Ethics Issues For Mainland Firms Involved In Maui Fire Suits

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    Before law firms located outside of Hawaii represent clients affected by the Lahaina wildfires, they must be aware of local ethics rules and regulatory gray areas, as any any ethical missteps could have major ramifications for the firm's practice in its home jurisdiction, says Ryan Little at Klinedinst.

  • Perspectives

    More States Should Join Effort To Close Legal Services Gap

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    Colorado is the most recent state to allow other types of legal providers, not just attorneys, to offer specific services in certain circumstances — and more states should rethink the century-old assumptions that shape our current regulatory rules, say Natalie Anne Knowlton and Janet Drobinske at the University of Denver.

  • Identifying Trends And Tips In Litigation Financing Disclosure

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    Growing interest and controversy in litigation financing raise several salient concerns, but exploring recent compelled disclosure trends from courts around the country can help practitioners further their clients' interests, say Sean Callagy and Samuel Sokolsky at Arnold & Porter.

  • How Jurors' Great Resignation Views Affect Corp. Defendants

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    With recent surveys finding that many workers expect to leave their jobs in the next year, corporate defendants should consider measuring potential jurors’ attitudes about the "great resignation," which may reveal biases against large corporations and beliefs about personal responsibility, say Jorge Monroy and David Metz at IMS Consulting.

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